In response to RAVSIM’s Newest Article

It’s not the biggest site, nor is it the most active, but RAVSIM published one hell of an article today, detailing the sometimes toxic and incredibly hostile community surrounding Sim Racing. Titled My Sim is Bigger Than Your Sim, the piece pulls no punches and directly points fingers at the exact reasons why multiple community websites surrounding driving games as a whole are unwelcoming environments, full of elitists, fanboys, and forum trolls.

RavsimYou owe it to yourself to read the article in full. Go to their site, give them hits, and feel good about doing so.  You’ll be lost if you don’t, as this entry is a direct response to the writings of spamsac, but I’ll do my best to summarize for the sake of convenience:

  • “As an outsider to sim racing communities, I find that most are filled with trolls, fanboys, and hostility upon visiting them.”
  • “With so many great racing games available, there is no need for endless infighting”
  • “Fanboys believe relentlessly attacking other products, while defending their favorite game, is somehow helping them win an invisible war.”
  • “Because of the extremist fanboy behavior, many forums have turned into unwelcoming environments, as fanboys cannot rationally be reasoned with.”
  • “I buy every racing sim, regardless of whether I’ll play it or not. Am I wrong for not becoming involved in the community and attempting to clean it up myself with so much time and money spent on these games?”
  • “Is it right for the developers of racing sims to be tasked with handling a constant stream of negativity in the forums?”
  • “Video game developers have feelings, and criticism of their product makes them feel bad. They are most likely losing patience with the toxic communities surrounding their products.”
  • “Please do your part to stop others from being rude to developers, and to each other. The amount of trolling, fanboyism, and infighting is becoming intolerable.”

There are some portions that I agree with, and some portions that I don’t. I’ll do what I can in this response.

acs 2015-10-23 15-55-57-82Hostile message boards are a product of the entertainment medium itself. The reason you see so many conflicting views and eventually fights on a wide variety of message boards within the greater driving game community is because video games do not discriminate. There is no stereotypical iRacing member, or stereotypical Assetto Corsa owner. If I tell ten people to sketch me a drawing of a typical Metallica fan in the 1980’s, all ten drawings will look roughly the same – a skinny white male with long hair and a Master of Puppets T-Shirt. You can’t do this with Game Stock Car Extreme or rFactor 2.

As a result, the extreme diversity puts successful businessmen, retail store managers, and even legendary EDM artists under the same roof as teenagers getting their first taste of the internet, or guys who simply lack age-appropriate social skills due to a vast array of spectrum disorders. This melting pot of personalities is nothing more than a chemical reaction; one which breeds levels of drama reminiscent of our high school experiences. And given that there isn’t a teacher to individually pull shit disturbers aside and force them to sort out their differences, or understand each other a little more, sometimes it’s just easier to launch a few rockets at others and move forward.

There is no better example of this shit-slinging than the fabled Darin Gangi versus Matt Orr incident, which Matt documented for public consumption on his YouTube channel. Essentially, two YouTube personalities went to war, and we all got to watch.

This was the precise moment where I realized a tabloid-style Sim Racing news site could potentially be successful. Matt’s video calling out the host of InsideSimRacing attracted a much larger amount of views compared to videos he’d uploaded earlier in the week, and nearly every active member of the iRacing.com forums felt the need to voice their opinion on the matter. People were more interested in watching two grown ass men bitch at each other on YouTube, than they were in posting about iRacing’s newest update, released a week earlier.

With conflicting personalities and no teacher-like figure to give a speech in front of the entire class and tell everybody to cut it out, who’s right ends up being more important than being a decent human being, and to avoid the stress of this hostile environment, your options as a bystander are to either leave altogether or embrace it.

acs 2015-10-23 16-34-41-53The games themselves are the main cause of conflict. RAVSIM points the finger at shitty individuals within the community, but the dark sides of these individuals are only exposed during heated arguments, and these arguments don’t just spawn out of the nowhere.

An ugly truth about video games as a whole, one which will inevitably be studied by our children and grandchildren, is that there was a definite shift in the overall quality of interactive entertainment around eight years ago. In 2007, the mammoth profits generated by Halo 3, Guitar Hero III, and Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare made nearly everyone within the industry stop and evaluate their own operations from the ground up. Developers were sent into overdrive, desperately searching for every last way to make a fraction of the money that customers began throwing at Call of Duty on a yearly basis.

And turning a medium of entertainment into a game of numbers was an approach that was harmful to the customers. A bombardment of DLC packs for Forza and Need for Speed, ones which included content developed well before the game’s release in an effort to secure a bit more of that precious cash, segregated the community. A new reliance on patches delivered via automatic updates to both consoles and PC’s connected to Steam allowed developers to quickly push out games to meet time constraints, promising to fix issues as the playerbase discovered them – which was pretty damn often. The skyrocketing costs of developing even the most rudimentary game quickly eradicated niche titles from the market, with the Xbox 360 failing to receive a licensed NASCAR title for three straight years, when the Playstation 2 had seen everything from a D1GP Drifting sim, to a hardcore NHRA Drag Racing sim.

The final nail in the coffin for the industry as a whole was the introduction of Steam’s Early Access format, allowing developers to sell an Open Beta of their upcoming product at a discounted price, never requiring them to actually finish the game.

acs 2015-10-23 16-15-24-14ISI proudly displays a disclaimer for rFactor 2 on their homepage, stating that “rFactor 2 is an evolving product, and as such, we expect to be adding cars, tracks and features for many years to come. We encourage people to purchase rFactor2 based on its current features and content at the time of purchase.” The game first went on sale in 2012, and has effectively been in a work-in-progress state for almost four years. Updates are not described as “patches”, but rather “builds.”

The splash screen for RaceRoom Racing Experience describes the game as an “Open Beta“, and the online component is given the title of Multiplayer Alpha, despite there being almost $90 worth of expansion packs for the title, as well as several micro-transactions buried within the game for individual cars and tracks.

8975Project CARS was delayed three times, eventually shipping with several game-breaking bugs and glitches that turned the game into a bit of a laughing stock, and a while back released its fifth major patch in as many months. With the average user score described as “Mixed” on Metacritic with a rating of 64, most of the post-release criticism from those within the sim community was directed at specific sites who were confirmed to have been paid by developer Slightly Mad Studios to bombard readers with a flurry of Project CARS articles. While the work-in-progress title was never given to Project CARS upon release, the announcement of a sequel before the first game had even landed on store shelves was enough for us to read between the lines. The game’s launch was met with hundreds of glitch videos showing up on YouTube within a few days, and the head of the studio calling his customers idiots.

virtualrSomehow, throughout this mess, the NASCAR license was awarded to a company in Europe, leading to predictable results and a stream of games never rising above shovelware quality.

And then we start getting into the heavy hitters. After a year spent in Early Access and another year sold for full price on Steam, with two massive premium DLC packs to complement the vanilla content, you still cannot pick the color of your car in Assetto Corsa’s multiplayer component. Features we’d never expect to be left out of a racing sim in 2015, hell, even in racing games available for your SmartPhone, are disregarded by the small team of Italian developers, in favor of lengthy dribble about yet another tire model revision nobody asked for. The popular racing sim has transcended what it means to be a video game, and instead established itself as a science project with no completion date.

onedaySwitching things up a bit, we now examine F1 2015, a Codemasters title that aimed to please a broader audience as opposed to diehard racing sim enthusiasts. After rumors that Codemasters were having difficulty developing the game for next generation hardware began to circulate, the game indeed shipped as a buggy mess, and currently has a score of 39 on Metacritic.

https://pretendracecars.files.wordpress.com/2015/07/1436645346627.png?w=656

Next, we visit Bugbear’s Wreckfest. A title that first raced onto Steam’s Early Access platform in late 2013 based on the FlatOut games from a decade ago, Wreckfest is still stuck in Early Access with only a few months until 2016. The Wikipedia for the entry paints a dire picture, noting that the last update for the game was released in June of 2015, and that Bugbear themselves are unsatisfied with the pace of development.

Next Car Game 2014-02-22 18-01-17-86But no one particular game displays the sad state of affairs within the motorsports genre better than Game Stock Car Extreme by Reiza Studios. Centering around the Stock Car Brasil series in South America, as well as the numerous amateur support classes, the game is a stand-alone payware rFactor mod, to the point where files integral to the much improved force feedback effects can be directly copied over to a vanilla rFactor install. I first bought rFactor back when I was in middle school, and I’ll be 23 in a few short days. If you would have told me I’d still be playing fucking rFactor nearly a decade later because it’s the only place to race competitively without a company taking your money because they can’t handle criticism, I would have learned more than just power chords on my guitar.

GSC 2015-06-06 15-19-25-71This is not a Golden Age of Racing Sims as RAVSIM describes. The lack of any one finished product to get immersed in causes community members who once spent hours in GTR 2, Richard Burns Rally, or NASCAR Racing 2003 Season, to instead lurk the various message boards while killing time waiting for a future update or patch. Instead of discussing great races they’ve participated in, or sharing links to quality mods they’ve found, discussions often spiral out of control into which game is less broken, because they’ve lost interest in their current game of choice, and need something new to play.

During these discussions, the fanboys pop up.

acs 2015-10-23 16-01-00-35The increased traffic on message boards due to a lack of finished and/or engaging racing games allows developers to form genuine relationships with the average customer buying their game. While in theory this allows a developer unprecedented access to data and feedback straight from the source, without resorting to bullshit customer feedback surveys you see at car dealerships, in execution this generates a relationship that isn’t beneficial to either party.

The aforementioned teenagers just getting their feet wet in the world wide web, individuals with spectrum disorders affecting their social skills, or those who simply have too much time on their hands, see the developers and other various staff members interacting with the community as friends, rather than artists creating a piece of entertainment for a large group of consumers.

Ever had a buddy who played in a band? It’s easy to have a laugh at the opening act together, but telling him to stop playing shows drunk because it’s affecting his rhythm is a bit more difficult. This is the reality of developers forming relationships with their customers.

Ian Bell calls his customers idiots for failing to understand the unnecessarily complicated Force Feedback settings in Project CARS. Those who repeatedly document AI issues within Assetto Corsa are deemed as suffering from psychological problems by Stefano Castillo. iRacing’s Terms of Service and Virtual Rulebook force each customer to watch what they say in public about iRacing, in fear of losing substantial amounts of money for daring to post something negative. Even shovelware companies such as Eutechnyx are no strangers to this behavior; as quickly as NASCAR The Game 2013 opened an entire sub-forum for criticism and suggestions while the game was in the Early Access program, several users were given the boot with no explanation, and it was later revealed that the moderators were simply in it for a free copy of that year’s game upon release.

Often, users are simply removed from the forums after developers deem individuals as problematic; claiming their comments were either defamatory or non-constructive. However the margin for what each developer constitutes as constructive criticism is so goddamn slim, it is no longer possible to play by the house rules. Most people are opting not to jump through the numerous hoops required to report bugs or game-breaking issues “correctly”, as the rules are so complicated, they may as well be a fucking beta tester.

It is extremely hard to feel sorry for developers and “cut them some slack “when each game on the market is unfinished in its own special way, and those refusing to donate time and energy to hunt for bugs after laying down $60 for a video game are written out of the community, an effort best left to the fanboys sticking up for their buddy’s band.

snaaaaaakeIf developers continue to push out buggy, unfinished games, call their own customers idiots, put trusted news resources on the pay roll, and make friends with users prone to taking the relationship a bit too personally, the general mood on all message boards surrounding driving games will be stuck in negativity. Half of the users are too bored and unsatisfied with the current crop of titles that they’re forced to spend more time than usual participating in online discussions, and the other half of users are pissed because you’re talking shit about my buddy’s band!

The problem gets solved with better games.

acs 2015-10-23 16-12-43-24

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55 thoughts on “In response to RAVSIM’s Newest Article

      1. Well none of this is news, and it seems like maybe making a very detailed driving sim takes years. So, as consumers, we take the risk to invest in what we know is an “unfinished” game, because it wouldn’t be easy on these developers if they didn’t start collecting money for their product. SCE was crowd funded for stuff we won’t get for a while. So, what’s exactly the point of this article? To say stuff we already know?

        IMO, it almost is a good thing to know these games are always in developing stages. Think about it: NR2003 continues to update itself with proper Gen6 physics tweaks and updated tracks. That would be an awesome thing, wouldn’t it?

        Like

      2. as joenathan26 below responded:

        w.i.p. in “proper driving-simulation”-including racing games is kind of a blessing and a curse at the same time.

        Since I learned that one part of PRC’s head-team is in actuality a game-reviewer as in profession, this concept of course goes well against the trade he is involved in: you simply cannot form a final opinion about something that has not yet been brought to it’s final conclusion. Which means that the ideal function of a game-reviewer, which is essentially giving an informed opinion and recommendation about a finished game to their audience in order to help them decide whether or not to spend their money on it. Now that does not happen with any form of certainty for w.i.p. objects.

        So the potential is there that developers might willingly abuse this in order to circumvent the “professional opinion” as a mediator in the chain that makes up a traditional buying-decision when including games-media into the mix.

        On the other hand: realistic handling and physics-implementation is a field which has not been improved by any major game-maker / backed by any major publishing-house in the last ~10 years. Everything that gets focused on is more and more eye-candy and other hilarious – if not actually fun – game-play-innovations, none of them really focusing on realism at the centre of attention.

        So no wonder advanced driving-sims are going more-and-more off-mainstream in the sense of traditional business-models. iracing has made it sort-of popular to pay for a “service” and just off-loaded the immense costs of licensing and making games-content to it’s users – at a premium. Probably (as for my own speculation) by doing so making it profitable for racing-venues directly to have their track put into a game. At the same time: this makes it harder for other small-time developers to gain equal access to licenses while not braking the bank, I imagine!

        Let’s face it: people smart enough and educated enough to model believable and real-feeling driving-physics to a point where they are actually usable real-time in a racing-sim, will be skilled enough to warrant a much higher pay-check than what the income-opportunities as an independent games-developer would offer them. So I have to applaud those guys that actually forgo the potential for greater personal prosperity and wealth and actually sit down and make our current crop of high-level, realistic-ish driving- and racing-simulations.

        With customers in essence taking over the role of both players and beta-testers and feedback-panel, where does that leave games-critics? Well: they suddenly get to be less of an opinion-leader and suddenly see themselves much closer in importance to the actual consumer-population.

        Yet they are still not irrelevant – I might add. You can still point out the obvious, research the common traits and pitfalls of the market and provide an informed overview of how things are playing out for the individual projects and their players. Monitor the state of the art, so to say. Not irrelevant, at all in my eyes. May we might have to start thinking about critique not focused on one product at the time — but rather picking a feature or a specific set of related features and then compare how they play out amongst a group of games, instead.

        I think this would be possibly a much better way to serve the consumer in the “early access reality” of today and tomorrow.

        Am I wrong?

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    1. I say this having had direct contact and decent relationships with a few developers and other sim/review type people as well-

      We all get and respect the hard work put into your games. However nobody needs to throw a pity party for you. Our gratitude and sympathy was offered in the form of our credit card when we bought your product.

      I don’t think anyone’s crappy opinion, this website, any website, mine yours or any poster, Associator too should make you upset. Should you go associator mode? Absolutely not, you’re best served not giving anymore money to a product if it doesn’t fit your bill. Thats the real way to get the message across.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. “The margin for what each developer constitutes as constructive criticism is so goddamn slim, it is no longer possible to play by the house rules. Most people are opting not to jump through the numerous hoops required to report bugs or game-breaking issues “correctly”, as the rules are so complicated, they may as well be a fucking beta tester.”
    Yeah guess what, if you’re gonna have direct access to a bug report system (which games 10, 15 years ago simply did not offer) you’re expected to show a little sense in what you report. It’s not a general topics OMG Free Speech Post Anything forum, you save everyone time by reading the rules and following them.

    Like

  2. Sim racing is not in a good place right now. The games are messed up, the people who make them are unlikable and tone deaf to the community, and the community itself is just plain nasty to one another because they somehow think it’s their duty to crusade for their sim of choice. How do you fix that? I really don’t know but it’s certainly off-putting.

    I wish there was a way to get the fanatical geeks who spend hours fighting with each other on the internet to be reasonable, but we all know that isn’t going to happen. I wish there was a way to get these developers to pull their heads out of their asses but I don’t know the ins and outs of what they have to deal with, and anyway the only way to get their attention is to stop buying sub-par games en mass, and you know that just isn’t going to happen, such is the culture of instant gratification we live in.

    On the one hand, I agree that the games are partially to blame. I don’t think a single one of the current crop of sims is really that great. They each do some things well, but none of them does everything well. And most of them have really glaring issues that just make them flat out unenjoyable. And if a game isn’t fun, why should I play it? I’ve also observed some very unprofessional conduct by the developers of these games that really is just uncalled for. And they do seem unwilling to accept any criticism, constructive or not. So I can understand the discontent within the community.

    What I don’t get is why people think there’s some kind of war on between these games, and why they have to so zealously defend it. I mean do the nerds that do this really have nothing better to do? And can they not think of a better way to express their disappointment? Do they not realize that this isn’t real racing? That it isn’t their job to defend these games? That just because someone likes another game more doesn’t mean they should be personally attacked? Civility and reason is far more likely to get one’s message across, not acting like a middle schooler. But is this behavior surprising when the developers seem unwilling to have a constructive dialogue? Or when people in the community also are unwilling to be constructive with one another? I guess it’s too much to expect people with too much time on their hands, and who get WAY too invested in a bunch of pixels to act with a level of decency and respect, and that goes for any type of video game.

    It really just saddens me that when I think of sim racing, I don’t think of having fun, I think of all this negativity that’s surrounding it, to the point where I barely race at all at this point. And that’s a shame.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. The problem is that several people think that if the sim game has some problems they think it shouldn’t have, immediately becomes a rip off and ‘you should have never left early access or beta”.
      Some people are too intolerant and have no or little compassion. Maybe they should realize that sim studios don’t start with big funds and they need to release earlier to gain funds along the way to develop the game and buy content license. But is not just that, sim racing games are an evolving project along the years, whether you start with a lot of money or not. And is evolving mainly because of the physics system, things you considered very good and realistic in 2012, you find out in 2015 that more realism can be achieved. That’s why we are playing sim racing games and not racing games.

      Do you guys think that if the current sim studios (kunos, isi, reiza, iracing, sector3, sms) would want to release a product each two year cycle they wouldn’t? They could very well just create a finished game and let it stay there and this game would be like any other game you buy from steam, play for some months, and move to something else. In fact, this just sounds like console world, moving from new buzz to new buzz.
      But a sim racing game is foremost a game about an advanced car physics experience. The game comes after and might not be what you expected.
      But this is also because the team behind it is at their early stage of experience as game developers. Their future products tend to always improve in user’s experience as a driver in the virtual motorsports world. But this takes years.

      And don’t get too angry at one sim because it doesn’t have all you wanted in the way you wanted, especially when another sim can already fill some things the other isn’t.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Hear hear. The last paragraph of your comment is why I’ve lately felt like just putting the wheel in the closet and giving up.

      One could argue that you could just play the game and ignore the community aspect, but it’s not fun to enjoy games alone. I want to be able to go and talk about *title* with the like-minded, not to mention I’d be shutting myself away from any news or developments about it. Everything is in forums, Facebook and Twitter nowadays.

      Everywhere I go, it’s negativity. Arguments. Myself and a friend were told to go fuck ourselves, from another we had called our friend, for the simple act of saying we had lost interest in the title concerned – not deriding it, not talking bad, all we said was “nah, we’ve lost interest for now” and it led to one of the most autistic meltdowns I had ever seen. No, I will not name names. I was bothered before, but that was the tipping point; I am fucking sick of the state of things right now, and it makes me sicker realising that I’m even sitting here writing that sentence. About VIDEO GAMES.

      The only reason I even bother with simracing anymore is because there are two main titles out of the many that I enjoy enough to push through the bullshit and keep going with. If it wasn’t for them, I’d be out. “Golden age” is more like “dark age” in my book.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. “you still cannot pick the color of your car in Assetto Corsa’s multiplayer component.”

    Literally unplayable.

    “Features we’d never expect to be left out of a racing sim in 2015, hell, even in racing games available for your SmartPhone, are disregarded by the small team of Italian developers, in favor of lengthy dribble about yet another tire model revision nobody asked for.”

    This seems the argument of a person who wants to play sim racing games, but doesn’t want to play sim racing games.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s funny, you can absolutely pick the color of your car if the server’s configured to allow it – it’s the community who asked for and prefers to join servers where that’s not allowed.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Can you tell me of this magical mode in AC where I can pick my paint and not be pre-booked? Which means you could only have your choice in paint if its the one and only one assigned to you by the person booking you into their server.

        Meanwhile in 2015 every other sim available I could at least pick whatever default skin that I felt like in any server I felt like.

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      2. It’s called ‘booking session’, if you sign up to a server during booking, you’ll end up with whatever skin you have selected on the car you book at the time. It works exactly like iRacing’s official series – you sign up to the server and when it loads, your car’s available to drive.

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      3. If you set a no-booking server, people can join any time, but only using cars that the server has preselected, which means you don’t have a choice of skins. Public servers mostly run this mode, private/league servers tend to use booking since they’re running events at certain times.

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  4. “Everywhere I go, it’s negativity. Arguments. Myself and a friend were told to go fuck ourselves, from another we had called our friend, for the simple act of saying we had lost interest in the title concerned – not deriding it, not talking bad, all we said was “nah, we’ve lost interest for now” and it led to one of the most autistic meltdowns I had ever seen.”

    I might be able to explain this one, maybe, but not entirely. When you know yourself that you lost interest or motivation to play a certain game, and you tell someone about it who still has the interest and motivation to play it daily or weekly, they feel bad with what you said. Because is something taken a bit personally, with the idea that ‘if I’m having interesting and liking this game so much, why is the other feeling that way’; so a sentiment appears, feeling that the other person crapped on your interests and motivations for playing the game and is thinking less of your preferences.

    Is the same story about when people have the attitude of attacking a game you like to play. Is like that person is shitting all over your reasons to play the game you like, trying to make you not like it and think less of the game.

    Ethandean57, I think is easier for everyone that when you lose interest on a game, you just leave it there. Play another game. Or there are times when you feel you lost interest in many if not all games. What’s the purpose of saying that to someone, that you lost interest and motivation in playing when your friend is all excited about them? So I think is easier to take a pause, step back, do something else entirely, and with time is possible that you’ll regain interest. And is not a problem if you lost it again, take a pause, and again come back.
    Sometimes too much of a certain dish you like to eat a lot, will make you feel sick of it. So you just leave it and prepare other type of dish next time. But telling it to someone who is still in the excitement cycle, it just makes that person feel bad and question their reasons for liking it. Of course we should all learn to give in and accept others losing their interest, to preserve that friendships, because things come and go, people too sometimes. And sometimes you’re able to stick with things or stick with friends. So comprise is needed in various moments.

    For example when you finished with a girlfriend, and then comes another guy who likes her. Then you be like, how can you like her, she did this and that, she is like this and that. But let that person discover for himself, let them have their experience and not disappoint them right from the start. Because it can be a fresh beginning for the girl and the new boy, and they shouldn’t be deprived of living their moments and experiences.
    This example kinda drifted away from the main subject, so don’t take it as an exemplar example on what I discussed earlier. (;

    Like

    1. I’ve no idea why you write such lengthy and detailed responses to me, using women/relationship analogies, but I’ll roll with it.

      “I think is easier for everyone that when you lose interest on a game, you just leave it there. Play another game.”

      That is exactly what me and the friends concerned did, down to the letter. When asked “did you all try the new update?”, we said “nah, we’ve lost interest a little for now”, and that alone led to the tirade against us. It’s a personal issue I was mentioning incidentally, you don’t need to read quite this much into it.

      Like

  5. List of essential features missing in Assetto Corsa;

    Aerodynamics that takes proper sideslip/alpha into account
    -Properly handling stiff suspensions
    -Properly working AI
    -Properly working netcode
    -AI during multiplayer
    -Brake temperature
    -Oil temperature
    -Water temperature
    -Dynamic day/night cycles
    -Drivers swaps during multiplayer and singleplayer
    -Dynamic weather with rain
    -Proper race/flag rules
    -False starts
    -Rolling starts
    -Safety car
    -Proper damage
    -Pitstops in singleplayer
    -Visible tire deformation
    -Animated marshalls
    -Steering assist and adjustable speed sensitivity for keyboard users
    -Steering assist for gamepad users

    Allow me to repeat myself:

    Aerodynamics that takes proper sideslip/alpha into account
    -Properly handling stiff suspensions
    -Properly working AI
    -Properly working netcode
    -AI during multiplayer
    -Brake temperature
    -Oil temperature
    -Water temperature
    -Dynamic day/night cycles
    -Drivers swaps during multiplayer and singleplayer
    -Dynamic weather with rain
    -Proper race/flag rules
    -False starts
    -Rolling starts
    -Safety car
    -Proper damage
    -Pitstops in singleplayer
    -Visible tire deformation
    -Animated marshalls
    -Steering assist and adjustable speed sensitivity for keyboard users
    -Steering assist for gamepad users

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is not the real Associat0r. It’s an impersonator that mixes his old comments from around the web with some of his own.

      It’s the same guy as ass0factor.

      Like

  6. james you better use that box of tiisues and whipe that cum off your life sized mirror ,so you can see things more clearly .You and your site as wel wel as a lot off comments on it are the root off all evil

    Like

  7. Few fundamental flaws in Assetto Corsa ( just tip of the iceberg):

    – flawed underbody collisions
    – flawed collisions with other cars
    – flawed engine damage
    – broken netcode
    – lack of package system for easy auto update/download of mods during MP
    -flawed tire pressure gain with tempature increase
    -physics instabilities
    -completely broken AI that is worse than what 2 decade old racing games had
    -flawed force feedback
    -mods gets broken after every update
    -flawed suspension simulation
    -flawed load sensitivity

    Liked by 1 person

  8. People need to keep in mind that rFactor 2’s physics models are designed so that real engineer data can consistently be used to feed the model without fudging numbers, so that it’s properly suitable in a professional environment, which sadly is not the case for Assetto Corsa, which is one of the main reasons why rFactor 2 is so superior.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is not the real Associat0r. It’s an impersonator that mixes his old comments from around the web with some of his own.

      It’s the same guy as ass0factor.

      Like

  9. Pretty much the whole F1 grid and all Nascar manufacturers use rFactor Pro, none of them use Kunos software for race car development or driver training, it’s just not of the same grade.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. The fact that you Associat0r (if you are the real Associat0r) and your friend (hexagramme) think that Pcar is a better sim than AC discredits your opinions/facts .

    Defending you favorite sim is one think ,speak shit/misinformation about others…i used to think you dont like that? or is only when is against you favorite sim?

    like rfactor 2 dont have flaws/bugs/broken stuffs/unfinished physics/collisions problems … ? really?

    Like

    1. This is not the real Associat0r. It’s an impersonator that mixes his old comments from around the web with some of his own.

      It’s the same guy as ass0factor.

      Like

      1. I really don`t know how you can sink this low as a human being, it`s probably one of the saddest things i`ve seen so far on the internet, and that says alot…

        Like

  11. I can’t agree with how Reiza Studios got your “sad(dest) state of affairs” award, just because realfeel can be copied around in installs of anything gMotor based.

    Over the years they’ve provided fictional ‘league editions’ of F1 cars from different times, various touring cars, karts, plus all the other series represented, not to mention those that will eventually be represented (Lancer Cup, Formula V10, Porsche GT3 Cup). All of which will be released for free to game owners, new & old, even if they didn’t contribute to the crowdfunding.

    They’ve set up a whole sub-forum over at RaceDepartment, they do communicate to users, both positive & negative, and have been forward with any and all controversy that’s come up regarding the game.

    Are they perfect?, No. Is it a rfactor mod?, debatable IMO, they have the source code now, ‘mod’ may become irrelevant soon depending on what they do with it.

    But SMS should have them beat for ‘sad(dest) state of affairs’, given what they did back earlier this year.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Can we see the proof of motherfucker sticker pls ?) if so happened an d second account was created, there is no mistake in ban. Keep in mind the way, author talk to others (ye, subscribers growing up by that).

    Like

  13. I’m also the member of news&dev team from russian shiftup.org. We plan to start hardly split today’s market in 2 category: full sim, like a rFactor 1,2, Iracing, also world racing series, and midsim, something vanilla like a Assetto Corsa or forza. As simracing grows as industry, we now live in time, when black swans try to rise up with help of marketing and advertising. And it’s a good situation, when only a few games can be trusted as a true racing simulation with production quality physics. Same situation with Microsoft flight simulator and xplane, the ugliest one the better one, just because of more advanced, developed by science, physics, used as main training software in professional simulators. So I think the true racing sim must be updated on top scientific physics, plus have to be strong in terms of racing simulation. That’s it. when I started to simracing I was choked by the people who choose game and call them simracers. I’m not really fast, but I’m learning to sport driving as like for real (it’s interesting and helpful in many many ways) and using as much advanced physics as it available – then all the real skills start to make benefits, rather then just play the game with its own game mechanics, where you can once understand core mechanics and use it for your win. It’s give muc fun just to spend time in hard physical environment, learn to track, trying to win, compete in league. And hell yes – sims are just starting to be ideal. JUST fucking starting.

    Like

    1. As many words can be said, but I’m personally trust engineers. Read post here “not the way how to sell games in 2015” there will be small example in it.

      Like

  14. “or guys who simply lack age-appropriate social skills due to a vast array of spectrum disorders”

    The best line ever to grace the pages of the internet.

    Like

  15. …. and then you have fanboys who even create blogs to shit all over the sims they dislike and call it unbiased journalism. Sounds familiar? 😀

    Like

  16. Pingback: Anonymous
  17. I disagree with that point. Internet fights aren’t caused by the games’ flaws, the community disparity or buddy developers. Those fights are caused by the closeness of the games. They emulate a similar sport, in a similar way, and in the grand scheme of motorsport simulation, their differences are minute. No one fights about which is better between Need for Speed and Project Cars, because there is no possible comparison. However tons of people have argued for days about which Need for Speed is the best and with as much vehemence as there is on this community. And yet the need for speed games aren’t buggy or early access or incomplete.

    Same thing happens with call of duty vs battlefield, rock band vs guitar hero, fifa vs pes, etc. I guarantee you that even if every sim racing game is ultra-polished and bug free and totally complete, there will still be just as much fighting, if not more: when there are less things to objectively criticize, that’s when the fights turn ugly.

    And here’s why this happens all over game forums everywhere: emotionally resonant game mechanics
    This is the reason Assassin’s creed sells more copies every year even though it’s always exactly the same game as the one before and even as others in the same studio: far Cry, shadow of mordor, watch dogs, mad max… Those are all the exact same game: discover a zone, climb/hack a building/radio tower/computer center, get new events to do, rinse and repeat. But people like them, and will fight over which one is best, because they like how the gameplay feels better on one implementation compared to another one. And once you decide you like one game better than the others, your brain does the rest: cherry-picking evidence and distorting reality to support what you believe

    This is what happens in simracing. Game mechanics are the same across all of them, obviously. Therefore, whichever game one player thinks feels best will be the one he’ll be defending. That is, until he has spent enough time with enough sims that he’ll know the fact that it feels good isn’t the whole picture, and then he’ll be part of the “why is there so much fighting, what has our community come to?” Crowd.

    Like

    1. And it doesn’t help that BSimRacing actually calls it a “war” and actively tried to steer the community away from rF2 and hop onto AC for a few years now because of its bias.

      So instead of blaming the regular fanboys, blame it on the biased news sites that are run by fanboys.

      Like

    2. And it doesn’t help that BSimRacing actually calls it a “war” and actively tried to steer the community away from rF2 and hop onto AC for a few years now because of its bias.

      So instead of blaming the regular fanboys, blame it on the biased news sites that are run by fanboys.

      Like

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