rFactor 2 Setup Guide

David O’Reilly has written a massive in-depth setup guide for rFactor 2 with help from some very high level drivers from Formula SimRacing, which also gives an interesting look into what a professional level team goes through to get what they believe is the best setup every weekend. Although this is written for rFactor 2, the information inside works across all modern racing sims, and is something you definitely need to read. Many of the steps and tricks listed are exactly what I myself do when building a setup.

You can download the guide HERE.

As far as my own setup guides go, I have been busy getting ready for the upcoming iRacing.com Pro Season and finishing off the current NASCAR Peak Anti-Freeze Series, as well as having the new surface model on my shoulders.. As many of you have now experienced, the new surface model is very good in some ways and allows multi groove racing but is still lacking some key features – such as graphically showing us where the shade actually is on track, or where the rubber build up currently is on track.

As Eric Hudec himself has said, the new surface model is dynamically effected by the actual position of cars on the track, and from Peak Anti-Freeze Series testing, this has been the case. I will have a very in-depth guide on how to get the most out of the new surface model for the oval side coming up soon, though keep in mind it may be subject to change depending on what changes iRacing makes to it over the coming months.

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11 thoughts on “rFactor 2 Setup Guide

    1. Force Feedback – the simulation of physical attributes such as weight in computer gaming and virtual reality, allowing the user to interact directly with virtual objects using touch. Keyboards don’t have this.

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      1. It’s not associat0r it’s a douchebag trying to mock him. You know those idiotic crybaby princesses who dislike anyone who dares thinking critically and shove their ignorance in their stupid face.

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      2. If only Associator would think or himself, he might stop and actually write something instead of copy/pasting links, articles and thoughts of others. That dude is seriously mentally ill, and if you don`t realize that then i`ve got news for you….

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      3. You’re so butthurt. Providing links to back your claims is not critically thinking, then i must have missed something along my life especially that part at school which explains how to argument. But repeating fancy and complex(well for you at least) expressions without understanding what they mean in long term ad nauseam like a parrot to reinforce your belief that belonging to the sheeple gives you an identity?

        You see him you hatin’ that’s all. Get back to your kindergarden kiddo.

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  1. I’ve heard it said that the insults you expect to sting the most are the ones you’d hate to hear aimed at yourself. Not sure what that makes me. But it makes you a crybaby princess.

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    1. That’s a critical analysis of your attitude after reading that first comment which is yours and nothing more than an ad hominem attack on somebody who hasn’t even posted here. Get over yourself. You aren’t special, you’re a big baby who acts like a butthurt princess.

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  2. That guide smells like PLAGIARISM.COM. I can understand wanting to create a guide and wanting to help the community, but do it from your own fucking experience and with your own fucking work. Not the hard work of others who spent the time getting properly clued up.

    Referencing the work is fine, using it as your own is not.

    Also, this guide pertains more to real life and not to sim racing, where there are tons of weird manipulations which need to be made to sim racing setups to make them fast and durable, thanks to wonky code and weird physics. Some settings you wouldn’t dare use in a real car.

    Good effort for collating everything into one TLDR guide. Now take your name off of it and credit the right people for their hard work.

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