That’s a Pretty Nice Car Roster for Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo

Group A

A post by Milestone on the Steam Community Page of all places has revealed a partial car roster for the upcoming multi-platform rally sim Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo, set for release in late January of 2016 after what appears to be a much needed delay. With hardcore rally fans pointing out the obvious lack of quality in initial trailers, the team over in Italy kicked things into overdrive to capitalize on the extra five months of development, and the results are beginning generate a bit of hype for the title.

While Codemasters was able to pull off something phenomenal with DiRT Rally on a shoe-string budget, the game was unfortunately a bit light on content. The partial car roster reveal for Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo appears to directly already take aim at one of the weak points of DiRT Rally, as the 1990’s Group A class reveal includes one car from every major brand that competed for a championship during the Sega Rally days.

The Modern WRC class has also received a substantial amount of cars compared to DiRT Rally. Dubbed the Evo class to get around obvious licensing restrictions, all four cars campaigned during the 2015 World Rally Championship season will be included in Milestone’s upcoming rally sim, along with Loeb’s dominant Citroen C4, Subaru’s final WRC-spec entry, and the 2011 Mini Countryman.

Group WRC

The info “leak”, if you can call it that, doesn’t stop there, as Alan over at TeamVVV has recently uploaded a lengthy video showcasing his time at Milestone Interactive, where the team behind Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo held a demonstration event for the gaming press. The ten minute video showcases a bit of driving footage mixed with some of the features rally fans can expect when the full title drops in January. The main rally portion of the game will feature eight locations (as opposed to DiRT Rally’s six), over 300km of point to point stages (as opposed to DiRT Rally’s 144km), and a full career mode where players can purchase and upgrade vehicles. An in-game livery editor similar to the one seen in iRacing will allow players to create a car they can call their own by using a lengthy list of preset and selecting the colors they’ll consist of.

We still haven’t seen a single maximum attack run in Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo, but so far the game is shaping up to be a NASCAR Thunder-like experience, where a massive list of content and feature set keeps people coming back for more despite a relatively simplistic driving model.

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13 thoughts on “That’s a Pretty Nice Car Roster for Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo

  1. “[…] and a full career mode where players can purchase and upgrade vehicles. An in-game livery editor similar to the one seen in iRacing will allow players to create a car they can call their own by using a lengthy list of preset and selecting the colors they’ll consist of.”

    All they need is GRID 1 style sponsors, and they have one hell of a career mode there.

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  2. US industry standards is “Five 9’s”, or up 99.999% of the time (this includes updates/maintenance/etc). I think we know that, by now, they aren’t in compliance.

    Anyone surprised? Shouldn’t be.

    They are the main behemoth in online racing, with no real competition, so it should not shock anyone that they aren’t exactly consumer friendly trying to keep their users completely happy (if they were, they’d be compensating users on some level). No competition means they can pretty much do as they want because no single individual has the clout or money to take them on in a legal dispute.

    Class action, that’s another thing, but that requires dozens upon dozens of users to band together (potentially hundreds) which isn’t going to happen simply because everyone is too cowed to even mention it, for fear of reprisals and never being able to race on their service again.

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  3. >300km
    It’s over twice as much road as DiRT Rally has, but it’s still less than games from the 90’s had, so it’s really not that impressive. Would expect something like 2000-2500km by this time.

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    1. The technology has advanced but the costs didn’t go down, possibly are higher now. So is useless to ask for 10x more tracks or km of rally tracks, because it isn’t cheaper in 2015 than it was in the 90s, or even 10 years ago.

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      1. >The technology has advanced but the costs didn’t go down, possibly are higher now.
        prices of electronics surely went down since the 90’s, while the quality and performance went way up. data storage is cheap, any phone can take photos and record videos.

        developed software matures over time, becomes more generic, flexible and re-usable, so it’s easier and faster to get shit done. faster and easier means cheaper

        technology is definitely not the barrier here

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  4. “developed software matures over time, becomes more generic, flexible and re-usable, so it’s easier and faster to get shit done. faster and easier means cheaper

    technology is definitely not the barrier here”
    The fallacy is that: the in-game assets do need a lot more work to be completed than with 20 year old titles that did not need and could not make use of the higher detail.
    What exactly does laser-scanning a race-track make easier? It gives you a geometrically correct point-cloud. Does the laser make note of where the track ends and which point gives gip-level x? No it does not. Same with today’s sophisticated graphics: they did not lessen the work-load for the artists: they rather made it increase exponentially.

    The stuff that is cheap today is computing power. Real labour (as in making that stuff “do” something useful) did not get any cheaper as it was 10 or 20 years ago.

    Dirt Rally and SBRE: seems like there will be some common ground on how to compare the two: I did spot that famous Welsh rally-stage in the VVV-coverage. Only thing I did not see is that titanium-pole at the 180° switch-back (how is that chicane-place called in-between the two water-traps, again?)

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  5. >the in-game assets do need a lot more work to be completed than with 20 year old titles that did not need and could not make use of the higher detail
    Sure, if you used the 20 year old development tools to develop a modern game, which misses my point completely. As technology advances, dev tools should also advance. If they actually don’t, it’s not a technology barrier, it’s the developers’ fault/choice for not advancing (justified or not – doesn’t matter in this context)

    >What exactly does laser-scanning a race-track make easier?
    Why is there suddenly a point about laser-scanning racing circuits? But do take note that a racing circuit is much, MUCH less complex than a rally stage in virtually every aspect.

    >Real labour (as in making that stuff “do” something useful) did not get any cheaper as it was 10 or 20 years ago.
    The video game industry has grown so there should be more than enough revenue to compensate for that. Programming is continuously growing as a profession so there shouldn’t be a deficit of workforce either.

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    1. >The actual development costs of a race or rally track aren’t cheaper in 2015 than they were in 2000, 2005, 2010
      sure, if you’re building from scratch every time

      If you already have a set of circuits or stages, you can reuse and update them in the next iteration of the game; if not the game data directly, then at least the reference materials and/or raw data collected when the track was first built from scratch for the game. Updating data is surely not as expensive as gathering everything again from zero

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