Is Forza Motorsport Ready for Windows 10?

12605540_10204607396379697_2255617128338610693_o

What began as mere speculation has now been all but confirmed. The Forza Motorsport franchise – once used as an Xbox exclusive to lure gamers into purchasing microsoft’s home console – will now be coming to Windows 10 via Microsoft’s revolutionary new “cross-buy” system. Those who purchase future copies of Forza Motorsport 6, or the upcoming Forza Horizon 3, will receive a Windows Store code for a PC copy of the title at no additional charge. Essentially, PC sim racers will be buying an Xbox One copy of Forza Motorsport 6 solely for this bonus code, and proceeding to gift the spare copy of Forza to a friend with an Xbox. That’s pretty cool.

It may not feature the Steam integration everybody wants, and the forced upgrade to Windows 10 may upset the conspiracy theorists like myself who believe the critically acclaimed operating system installs unwanted backdoor spying functionality, but many will see these as necessary sacrifices to bring Forza to the PC. The biggest hurdle Turn 10 currently faces is implementing all relevant hardware compatibility options to ensure the success of the PC version. Hardcore sim racers are a remarkably different crowd than the laid-back audience currently on Microsoft’s Xbox One, and a quick and dirty port just wont cut it here. As Milestone learned with Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo, building the best rally game of all time means fuck all if nobody’s shit works on PC. Sim racing thrives on unique hardware upgrades, and if you want to see total chaos on launch day, tell the drift guys their handbrakes aren’t compatible.

Yeah, that won’t fly.

12715955_10204730505737354_8459684958783652138_o.jpg

As a racing simulator, Forza faces an extremely challenging task when migrating over to Windows 10. The negative stigma surrounding the Forza franchise will divide online racing communities in ways never thought possible, as most sim racers previously abandoned the series due to their needs no longer being met by the popular console entry. A simplistic tire model, exaggerated tracks, and emphasis on career progression has traditionally planted the physical driving experience solely in the rear view mirror. Instead of expanding on the actual gameplay experience, Turn 10 have given customers more ways for them to not play Forza. The rewind button coupled with other assists became a crutch, demolition derby modes like Car Soccer or Cat & Mouse encouraged mindless bashing, livery design competitions grew into communities, and the abundance of wreckers online chased away all serious racers.  Save for a few serious online leagues, Forza Motorsport ended up being less about the racing, and more about dicking around with cars.

12291988_10204370485417071_3153380285208762036_o

Yet compared to the two most popular modern PC racing sims, Forza Motorsport 6 has the potential to be something special when it inevitably launches on Windows 10. Objectively, Forza 6 is a more feature-complete title than Project Cars or Assetto Corsa, and those who once dismissed the Forza series may indeed find themselves crawling back to it. To illustrate how competitive Forza 6 will be out of the box compared to Version 9.0 of Project CARS, as well as Version 1.4 of Assetto Corsa, I’ve prepared a few sleep-inducing charts which demonstrate that Forza Motorsport 6 is the superior game on paper – and sim racing elitists should at least give it a chance.

Content

We start by comparing the overall list of content across all three titles. While Forza obviously has the edge in the sheer amount of cars included in the vanilla release, the game earns extra points by also ensuring the cars and tracks within the game are pieces of content that sim racers are familiar with. With Modern GT3 entries and Historic Grand Prix rides routinely attracting the most virtual drivers in the world of PC sim racing, Forza has all of the essentials covered – and then some. Those who loved the laser-scanned Nurburgring in Assetto Corsa, or can’t get enough of GT3 cars at Spa in Project CARS – Forza will make them feel right at home. What’s also important to note is that Forza’s managed to bag the big three supercar manufacturers that often play hard-to-get with video game developers: Ferrari, Lamborghini, and Porsche. The end result is that the list of content in Forza Motorsport 6 compared to PC sims is a pretty one-sided affair; Forza’s got basically everything you’d expect to find in your standard racing sim, and then throws an additional 350 cars on top of that. Even the third party mod connoisseurs who routinely spend hours digging for more Assetto Corsa mods will struggle to inflate their game to the size of what Forza 6 offers by default. And that’s something to really get excited over.

Game Aspects

Next, we proceed to compare the Game Aspects between the three most popular racing sims. Now, what exactly is a “Game Aspect,” you might ask?  In short, it’s the shit you can do that fleshes out the on-track experience. Modes, features, options, functionalities… That sort of thing. And again, this is a pretty one-sided affair. Forza and Project CARS both offer a full single-player career mode compared to Assetto Corsa’s pitiful “here are some themed races you can do” campaign, but Forza steadily chugs into the lead as you dig further and further into the title. The sheer depth of performance and visual upgrades opens up entirely new ways to play Forza, ones not seen in it’s immediate competitors. The ability to sit down and build an amateur track day entry out of any of the 350+ production cars in the game is something truly unique to the world of sim racing, and will surely extend the lifespan of Forza once sim racers tire of the default array of race-prepared vehicles.

Staying toe-to-toe with Project CARS through the list of Game Aspects, Forza pulls ahead with the inclusion of the storefront – allowing racers to purchase car setups, liveries, and custom decals with the in-game credits they’ve earned. While Assetto Corsa needlessly complicates things with an external server tool, creating a custom online lobby in Forza 6 is all done through the in-game multiplayer menu with relative ease. Lastly, automatic updates allow those with who don’t own all of the game’s premium DLC to still participate in events with each other.Everywhere you turn in Forza 6, there’s something to do, and PC sim racers will lose several hours exploring every nook and cranny.

On an unrelated note, this list of Game Aspects unintentionally demonstrates how much the title by Kunos Simulazioni lacks when compared to other Xbox One racing sims; foreshadowing the overwhelmingly negative reception Assetto Corsa is likely to receive when released on next-gen consoles in April. There’s a demonstrable lack of things to do.

Simulation Value

But now it’s time for the big debate – the Simulation Value argument. The truth is, not one of the three biggest racing sims on the market today can be labelled acceptable, as they’re all missing more than a few aspects integral to a complete simulated racing experience. For starters, Project CARS doesn’t let you save more than one car setup per track, and often throws you into multi-class events with cars that are in no way compatible with each other. Assetto Corsa’s graphics engine doesn’t allow for more than one light source, ruling out night racing altogether, nor is there any functionality in the current consumer version of the game that allows for false starts or pit stops in offline races. All three titles strangely lack the presence of a safety car, and Forza omits flag rules altogether in favor of dirty lap time penalties and sticky grass. While the abundance of game modes may make some temporarily forget that Forza doesn’t offer much in the form of authentic racing rules, some of this stuff would be really nice to have given how fleshed out the rest of the title is. Though some elitists will undoubtedly knock Forza’s lack of Simulation Aspects, it’s a pot calling the kettle black scenario. From an objective standpoint, no sim racer can honestly shit on Forza Motorsport 6, because as displayed above, the two most popular PC titles aren’t much better. In fact, they’re all over the place.

What bothers me about Forza Motorsport 6’s lack of Simulation Aspects from a personal standpoint, and will be an issue I consider crippling if it’s not rectified in time for the PC release, is the outright lack of a seat position adjustment for the game’s atrocious cockpit view. Look, I’m on a 24 inch monitor and would prefer to be using as much of that surface area as possible to view the road ahead. I’m already holding a steering wheel in my hands and need to look at the apex rather than the random buttons in the cockpit; I don’t need both cluttering up my screen. Like, I’m sorry, but this is just totally useless. 70% of the monitor is spent on shit you will never be looking at.

maxresdefault

Of course, two most important aspects are areas of the game we can’t measure via simple comparison charts. It remains to be seen how Forza’s admittedly simplistic tire model and overall physics engine will stack up compared to the more established PC racing sims. My personal prediction is that Forza 6 will surprise me and closely resemble the driving model in Assetto Corsa, but receive a significant amount of unwarranted hate elsewhere in the early days of the PC release. As we’ve gone over before here on PRC.net, the majority of sim racers simply can’t drive, yet have no problem taking to various sim racing message boards voicing their “expertise” on vehicle dynamics. Regurgitating marketing buzzwords and nonsensical adjectives while scrutinizing tire model performance, I’m eagerly anticipating the release of Forza 6 on PC to see comments from backmarkers claiming they dropped the title after an hour and went back to iRacinga sim with an equally underwhelming tire model.

12309669_10204350997129876_4827298722461342805_o.jpg

As a sim racer that’s been largely let down by the current crop of racing sims, I’d love for a proper Forza release on PC to shake things up, and it appears we’ll receive just that. However, Forza won’t revitalize the genre just by showing up – Turn 10 must optimize the game for PC sim racers who need the extra level of functionality provided by dedicated PC racing sims. Many secretly want a Forza release to be successful on PC, but a rough console port could push the game’s overall reception in the completely opposite direction. I think the best move for Turn 10 at this point is to become active on a variety of high traffic sim racing forums, and assertively ask what needs to be done to ensure Forza 6 is compatible with as many configurations as possible. If the prospect of dealing with rabid fanboys is too much to handle, I’d draw up a document myself – as long as it doesn’t fall on deaf ears.

11239616_10204196071416830_3283955268493610063_o

Advertisements

82 thoughts on “Is Forza Motorsport Ready for Windows 10?

  1. Next after “in-game lobbies” you really should have put “dedicated servers running lobbies” cause for any sort of serious racing (more than 8 or 12 players) people are not going to accept peer to peer.

    I don’t really understand the distinction between AC’s “career mode” and PC’s; they’re both arbitrary series arranged vaguely in the order that you’d be able to enter them in real life (starting in street cars and karts, ending in GT2 + F1)

    Like

    1. When I said I don’t really feel the physics in Assetto Corsa to be of simulation value, I was comparing it to the way a racing driver and racing team and even vehicle manufacturers can use rFactor and rFactor 2’s physics to develop their cars and their drivers in a way that provides accurate data which they can rely on to use at races.

      To give you an example. All our race team clients and even our series clients, they don’t only use rFactor for track familiarization. They also use it to test setup data before they go to an event, they use it to test potential new part data, by developing new brakes or new engine performances and testing it in the game before they actually commit to building it in real life. rF1 and rF2 provide far higher accuracy for those things than any other simulation on the market. When it comes to AC, their game is marketed for a set audience which covers not only the Simulation side, but the Semi-Arcade side. When I drive rF1 or rF2, I’m always in a serious state of mind, I can’t just go out on the track and run a few laps. It is too simulation based and I treat it as such. I work on my setups, I push to find every tenth I can throughout a lap. I analyze too much. When I play Assetto Corsa, I can easily go in, pick a car and track, chill back and drive using my Xbox360 controller and not give a care. The physics seem very much like Forza Motorsport 5, a console game physics HOWEVER, Kunos has done a great job to mix the two styles of physics to provide more sense of simulation for the simulation fans, but cut down to the wire, rFactor 2’s physics engine is by far the most simulation based physics engine using real life aero and physical data that no other title has come close to.

      Like

    2. When you enter real data to rFactor 2, it works like real life, it’s not the case for Assetto Corsa, you always have to use workarounds and substitute models 🙂

      Like

    3. Assetto Corsa is developed by Italian studio Kunos Simulazion – Released last year for Windows, the game will be coming to PS4 and Xbox One next year, it does cede a little more ground to the notion that ‘game’ isn’t such a dirty word.

      According to James Dover, the game can be happily played with a controller. But while the game does deliver in terms of graphics, James reckons its physics engine “lacks seriousness”.

      Like

  2. I think you’re misunderstanding “cross-buy”. The games will be available on the Windows store – no need to buy a boxed xbox copy to get a code for PC, that would be silly.

    Like

    1. When I said I don’t really feel the physics in Assetto Corsa to be of simulation value, I was comparing it to the way a racing driver and racing team and even vehicle manufacturers can use rFactor and rFactor 2’s physics to develop their cars and their drivers in a way that provides accurate data which they can rely on to use at races.

      To give you an example. All our race team clients and even our series clients, they don’t only use rFactor for track familiarization. They also use it to test setup data before they go to an event, they use it to test potential new part data, by developing new brakes or new engine performances and testing it in the game before they actually commit to building it in real life. rF1 and rF2 provide far higher accuracy for those things than any other simulation on the market. When it comes to AC, their game is marketed for a set audience which covers not only the Simulation side, but the Semi-Arcade side. When I drive rF1 or rF2, I’m always in a serious state of mind, I can’t just go out on the track and run a few laps. It is too simulation based and I treat it as such. I work on my setups, I push to find every tenth I can throughout a lap. I analyze too much. When I play Assetto Corsa, I can easily go in, pick a car and track, chill back and drive using my Xbox360 controller and not give a care. The physics seem very much like Forza Motorsport 5, a console game physics HOWEVER, Kunos has done a great job to mix the two styles of physics to provide more sense of simulation for the simulation fans, but cut down to the wire, rFactor 2’s physics engine is by far the most simulation based physics engine using real life aero and physical data that no other title has come close to.

      Like

  3. I assume Turn 10 have wanted to do this for a long time, while Microsoft have wanted to keep Forza an Xbox exclusive. But with the Xbone being a flop, they’re limited to selling Forza to the people who actually bought Xbones too.

    Tomb Raider saw something similar. Core Design were scared they might go bankrupt after they released Tomb Raider 1 as a Sega Saturn exclusive. You guys probably already know what happened when they released a PC and Playstation version later.

    Like

      1. Xbone sold 50% of the units the PS4 sold, and all major exclusives sold well below expectation, even Halo 5. In the eyes of a business man, this definitely counts as a flop

        Like

    1. Xbox One has sold more consoles at this point in its lifetime than the Xbox 360 did.

      However, the PlayStation 4 is performing better than the PlayStation 2.

      Xbox are doing well in absolute terms, it’s just that Sony’s doing three times better.

      Like

      1. Ps4 is actually doing twice as well as Xbox, but both are doing way better than previous consoles at this point in their life-cycles. However PC has and always will smash them in terms of figures because they are used for other stuff too, and it doesn’t even matter. PC gamers tend to be a very different audience to console gamers. I’m a PC gamer who plays consoles too, as i see benefits of each system. But it doesn’t matter which one sells what amount as long as they all thrive, which they are.

        Like

    2. LOL what? Xbox One is a flop? I guess if a flop is outselling your previous two consoles, outselling the PS3 and WiiU is a flop, give me more flops please. LOL..these trolls.

      Like

      1. It’s flopping on Asia. And it’s kind of funny that just a few weeks ago Forza surpassed a million units sold. It did far better in the past.

        Either flopping or not compared to the older gen, the fact is that 8th gen has been ho-hum so far. There’s nothing really compelling and worse, just the PS4 can offer 1080p even if suffering with bad frame rates. A game like Forza, running 1080p with 60fps isn’t the norm like logically would be, at least like most of us expected, for the current gen.

        Like

  4. We get it, James wants to buy Forza 6 so much. Mmmm.. yummy online livery selection.

    Now we gonna get another title added to the shill library. So far we have Raceroom and GSCE, now we gonna endure some articles of Forza 6 shilling.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. When I said I don’t really feel the physics in Assetto Corsa to be of simulation value, I was comparing it to the way a racing driver and racing team and even vehicle manufacturers can use rFactor and rFactor 2’s physics to develop their cars and their drivers in a way that provides accurate data which they can rely on to use at races.

      To give you an example. All our race team clients and even our series clients, they don’t only use rFactor for track familiarization. They also use it to test setup data before they go to an event, they use it to test potential new part data, by developing new brakes or new engine performances and testing it in the game before they actually commit to building it in real life. rF1 and rF2 provide far higher accuracy for those things than any other simulation on the market. When it comes to AC, their game is marketed for a set audience which covers not only the Simulation side, but the Semi-Arcade side. When I drive rF1 or rF2, I’m always in a serious state of mind, I can’t just go out on the track and run a few laps. It is too simulation based and I treat it as such. I work on my setups, I push to find every tenth I can throughout a lap. I analyze too much. When I play Assetto Corsa, I can easily go in, pick a car and track, chill back and drive using my Xbox360 controller and not give a care. The physics seem very much like Forza Motorsport 5, a console game physics HOWEVER, Kunos has done a great job to mix the two styles of physics to provide more sense of simulation for the simulation fans, but cut down to the wire, rFactor 2’s physics engine is by far the most simulation based physics engine using real life aero and physical data that no other title has come close to.

      Like

    1. is still a better experience than on pc. I think the forza 6 will encounter more problems on pc, so the best experience maybe will still remain on xbox. Plus you have all that great interface and friends, and you know the game always runs well.

      Like

  5. “What began as mere speculation has now been all but confirmed.”

    “My personal prediction is that Forza 6 will surprise me and closely resemble the driving model in Assetto Corsa, but receive a significant amount of unwarranted hate elsewhere in the early days of the PC release.”

    This is hilarious

    Like

    1. When I said I don’t really feel the physics in Assetto Corsa to be of simulation value, I was comparing it to the way a racing driver and racing team and even vehicle manufacturers can use rFactor and rFactor 2’s physics to develop their cars and their drivers in a way that provides accurate data which they can rely on to use at races.

      To give you an example. All our race team clients and even our series clients, they don’t only use rFactor for track familiarization. They also use it to test setup data before they go to an event, they use it to test potential new part data, by developing new brakes or new engine performances and testing it in the game before they actually commit to building it in real life. rF1 and rF2 provide far higher accuracy for those things than any other simulation on the market. When it comes to AC, their game is marketed for a set audience which covers not only the Simulation side, but the Semi-Arcade side. When I drive rF1 or rF2, I’m always in a serious state of mind, I can’t just go out on the track and run a few laps. It is too simulation based and I treat it as such. I work on my setups, I push to find every tenth I can throughout a lap. I analyze too much. When I play AC, I can easily go in, pick a car and track, chill back and drive using my Xbox360 controller and not give a care. The physics seem very much like Forza Motorsport 5, a console game physics HOWEVER, Kunos has done a great job to mix the two styles of physics to provide more sense of simulation for the simulation fans, but cut down to the wire, rFactor 2’s physics engine is by far the most simulation based physics engine using real life aero and physical data that no other title has come close to.

      Like

    2. When you enter real data to rFactor 2, it works like real life, it’s not the case for Assetto Corsa, you always have to use workarounds and substitute models 🙂

      Like

    3. Assetto Corsa is developed by Italian studio Kunos Simulazion – Released last year for Windows, the game will be coming to PS4 and Xbox One next year, it does cede a little more ground to the notion that ‘game’ isn’t such a dirty word.

      According to James Dover, the game can be happily played with a controller. But while the game does deliver in terms of graphics, James reckons its physics engine “lacks seriousness”.

      Like

  6. Adjustable seat is a must, hopefully they add that in. Dedicated servers would be nice but I’d mostly get Forza for the singleplayer anyway, something all the current sims are quite terrible at.

    Like

    1. When I said I don’t really feel the physics in Assetto Corsa to be of simulation value, I was comparing it to the way a racing driver and racing team and even vehicle manufacturers can use rFactor and rFactor 2’s physics to develop their cars and their drivers in a way that provides accurate data which they can rely on to use at races.

      To give you an example. All our race team clients and even our series clients, they don’t only use rFactor for track familiarization. They also use it to test setup data before they go to an event, they use it to test potential new part data, by developing new brakes or new engine performances and testing it in the game before they actually commit to building it in real life. rF1 and rF2 provide far higher accuracy for those things than any other simulation on the market. When it comes to AC, their game is marketed for a set audience which covers not only the Simulation side, but the Semi-Arcade side. When I drive rF1 or rF2, I’m always in a serious state of mind, I can’t just go out on the track and run a few laps. It is too simulation based and I treat it as such. I work on my setups, I push to find every tenth I can throughout a lap. I analyze too much. When I play Assetto Corsa, I can easily go in, pick a car and track, chill back and drive using my Xbox360 controller and not give a care. The physics seem very much like Forza Motorsport 5, a console game physics HOWEVER, Kunos has done a great job to mix the two styles of physics to provide more sense of simulation for the simulation fans, but cut down to the wire, rFactor 2’s physics engine is by far the most simulation based physics engine using real life aero and physical data that no other title has come close to.

      Like

  7. If MS do allow Turn10 to release FM onto PC, expect the established PC sim developers to collectively shit themselves. James has outlined how stacked FM6 is..sure it’s missing some of the typical aspects of motorsports but that won’t stop people from buying it in the hundreds of thousands of copies.

    If there is one thing console only sims have is money and lots of it and the ability to appeal to the enthusiast and casual alike.

    It sure is an interesting time to be a PC gamer and sim racer.

    Like

  8. When I said I don’t really feel the physics in Assetto Corsa to be of simulation value, I was comparing it to the way a racing driver and racing team and even vehicle manufacturers can use rFactor and rFactor 2’s physics to develop their cars and their drivers in a way that provides accurate data which they can rely on to use at races.
    To give you an example. All our race team clients and even our series clients, they don’t only use rFactor for track familiarization. They also use it to test setup data before they go to an event, they use it to test potential new part data, by developing new brakes or new engine performances and testing it in the game before they actually commit to building it in real life. rF1 and rF2 provide far higher accuracy for those things than any other simulation on the market. When it comes to AC, their game is marketed for a set audience which covers not only the Simulation side, but the Semi-Arcade side. When I drive rF1 or rF2, I’m always in a serious state of mind, I can’t just go out on the track and run a few laps. It is too simulation based and I treat it as such. I work on my setups, I push to find every tenth I can throughout a lap. I analyze too much. When I play Assetto Corsa, I can easily go in, pick a car and track, chill back and drive using my Xbox360 controller and not give a care. The physics seem very much like Forza Motorsport 5, a console game physics HOWEVER, Kunos has done a great job to mix the two styles of physics to provide more sense of simulation for the simulation fans, but cut down to the wire, rFactor 2’s physics engine is by far the most simulation based physics engine using real life aero and physical data that no other title has come close to.

    Like

  9. Those of us who frequent the Forza forums know that the general policy on issues with the game is radio silence from Turn 10. They refuse to even acknowledge problems until they already fixed them. This will not work with people from the PC market. Those Forza forums will become a bloodbath.
    Turn 10 are very indifferent towards their fans, and once PC players see that, they’ll likely steer clear.
    It takes Turn 10 ages, sometimes years to fix bugs on just the Xbox, can you imagine the delay with PC issues. Console owners tend to be more forgiving of issues and PC owners do not.
    I play PC for eye candy, and Xbox for online/exclusives, but the multiplayer on Forza is fucking joke these days. Full of “cod”iots who think every game is a battlefield and cause crashes every turn. It’s not fun racing in the online lobbies and they got rid of custom lobbies years ago now. Something else the PC crowd won’t like. PC users like choice and control. Turn 10 have sytematically removed both of those From Forza this past 3 years or so. It’s sad for Xbox players, but for PC players it’s a complete non-starter from where i’m sat on my brand new Skylake build which would make Forza look great, but what would be the point? lol

    Like

      1. People have ripped apart GT5 a couple of years ago and were *that* close to compiling unreadable data into fully functioning models. And the GT series is known for it’s uncrackable encryptions. They only gave up because the guy behind most of the tools needed stopped posting in their site ever again for unknown reasons.

        FM4 had only 1 last barrier and it was track meshes. And people after years of trying found a way to export those (Although the materials lost their settings upon extraction which meant they were of little use, but still).

        And I know of at least 2 people who have successfully decrypted RRE files which are commonly known for being impossible to crack open.

        With FM6 on the PC, sooner or later someone stubborn enough will find a way.

        Like

      2. haah encryption you say. HAHAH. The harder they encrypt it the longer the loading times, the worse the cpu usage, the lower the fps. As a result if i get the motivation which i will BECAUSE PORSCHE then models will not take too long to rip, around a month id say depending on how much i can be bothered. Dealing with blu-rays hardcoded bullshit is a massive hassle hence the console version hasnt been cracked but raw files on pc knocks down the biggest defence.

        Like

  10. A few things:
    – “demolition derby modes like Car Soccer or Cat & Mouse encouraged mindless bashing” – think about it this way: You can mess about in those modes whenever you want and whenever you want to have a more serious race, you can join a normal race lobby and automatically have less wreckers because they’re all in first-mentioned lobbies.
    – “Save for a few serious online leagues, Forza Motorsport ended up being less about the racing, and more about dicking around with cars.” Isn’t that the case with all racing games? I wouldn’t call it dicking around, I feel like “a virtual automotive playground” fits it better, but maybe I’m just being too optimistic.
    – “and sim racing elitists should at least give it a chance.” – Hell will freeze over before that’s gonna happen.
    – “the outright lack of a seat position adjustment for the game’s atrocious cockpit view” That even more of an issue when you keep in mind that FM3 had something along those lines. Well okay, it only had a FOV slider, but still … 6 years and a new console are in between those titles and we’re regressing?

    I really want FM6 to be good, but then, how can one have hope when it’s not even confirmed that the game is coming to PC?

    Like

      1. Pathetic little AC fanboy cunt, fucking mirror image of PCars fanboys, nay worse, now if someone posts a vid showing how shit AC AI, the AC community is going to stalk you?, little bitches, AC community getting close to those fucking retarded man boys SRD or what the fuck ever it is,stupid cunts need to get laid.

        Like

    1. Other sims use fake physics for AI, in fact they are just gliding ghosts. Maybe AC uses extra forces or you know.. an AI is able to calculate very quickly and precisely how much steering and pedal input needed to balance the car. A human driver usually gives the wrong input in certain moments or overshoots. But is also possible certain AI cars to have either stability control or extra grip.

      Like

      1. As a matter of fact AC’s AI don’t use stability control but do use similar logic to decide how much throttle to use. (if the wheels are slipping, they let off the gas, just like traction control would). As for extra grip, technically yes but only in a limited sense – during braking zones they may* have extra lateral grip so they can drive loose setup cars, but the AI doesn’t know about this grip – it’s still going to steer up to the normal limit and then assume it’s at the limit and not corner any harder, it’s just a little more stable.
        * car-specific settings, they don’t necessarily all have it.

        Like

    1. Oh he likes so much the new game he bought he just played 8.4 hours in 18 days. Round of applause everyone. Meanwhile, he has 214h in AC.

      Like

  11. Is this franchise tanked so low in sales (5 and 6 sold only 1m+), they have to canibalize XO just to make some revenues on PC?

    No doubt it will make some interest among players for a month or two, but then, will folks that play iR/RRe/rF/AC/pC shift to play FM?

    I’d say those who wanted it, they already forked a ****** 300€ for XO and that’s nothing compared to a price of a decent PC and the rest of the world just don’t care , too much.

    Now, don’t believe the hype)

    Like

    1. I want to play Forza6 too, but it’s not worth the 400€ I’d be paying to get it, as I have no interest in any other game on the XBone right now.

      Like

    2. I got xbox + fanatec adapter just for forza 6 to play in our private online league.

      It has been so much fun that I haven’t turned on any PC sims for couple of months now. I tried it one weekend and realised the poor and halfbaked state that PC sims are in. Having something like Forza puts things into perspective of what a racing game must be. The only thing missing is qualification and 3 screen support.

      Also – forza can bring in casual gamers who can turn into sim racers. That is how I started – gran turismo 3, 4; then got a wheel for xbox 360 and ran Forza 2, 3, 4 before I finally upgraded to PC sims.

      Like

  12. Would be nice if the moderator ban all this Anti-AC always repeating stupid childish bullshit out of the comments. AC is by very far superior over Forza and any other title except rF2 and Dirt Rally in terms of physics and in many aspects (car-selection, laserscanned tracks) better than rF2.

    Not the physics sucks in AC, it´s the FFB. I was very disappointed with AC since 1.3/1.4 depending on the car and at one point i remembered, i´ve an Accuforce with an alternative FFB just based on the physics. I switched to Foundation and immediately AC was unbelievable much better. For example the R8 (with or without LMS) was a disaster with ingame-FFB and is now my favorite car in this class, better than the 458.

    I guess Kunos put some artificial FFB-effects on many cars to make them more individual which sucks. I can say, driving AC with full Foundation without ingame-FFB is a huge difference with many cars and all are better. The physics are lovely, but somehow Kunos did some really stupid things to hide that fact.

    Like

    1. this post is coming from a guy that says ffb should feel lighter the more downforce the car is making at high speed.
      There are no ffb effects, unless you turn them on in the game menu. The Gain% is the multiplied value of the car suspensions generated torque. So the ffb is created by the car, that then is sent to our real life steering wheels in form of a force multiplier, because our wheels don’t take just raw values.

      If you keep on saying ffb is using effects, can you tell me from what they are coming?

      Like

      1. Never said a word about FFB-forces with downforce. Certainly it should be stronger. I complained about FFB static spring effects in some cars and to high forces running street cars even with less than 100 Km/h like the LaFerrari, which was much better before 1.3.

        I don´t know what Kunos did, but the FFB is in many cars is ridiculous far better with Foundation, so pure telemetry-based than with ingame-FFB and that was not the case prior 1.3, especially 1.4. They did a huge step with 1.3 in terms of tire-physics, but the ingame-FFB feels wrong with many cars.

        Like

    2. Since the force feedback is directly connected to the physics, it means that both FFB and the physics of AC suck. There’s no way around it. Kunos has done a piss poor job of this supposed “racing simulator”. It’s been revealed time and time again how Kunos has faked, fudged and cheated with physics values in order to appease the masses (and in some cases the companies from which they’ve licensed cars). It’s all a big joke, and to think that people fall for this nonsense is beyond me.

      The car selection is awful, a “racing simulator” with an emphasis on road cars? Fuck off. Tracks, while laser scanned, has awful, dull and lifeless track art which completely ruins immersion. Again, fuck off. Don’t even get me started on the embarrassing lack of features, to think that Kunos has the nerve to call this a modern racing sim is beyond anything. I still can’t select first gear before the lights go out.

      At best it’s a decent car screenshot simulator, and a half decent hotlap simulator, if you don’t care too much about proper physics and just want something pretty to gawk at with your lil’ peepers.

      AC is what’s wrong with this genre today, and Kunos stands for everything we as consumers should call out as bullshit. AC is NOT the direction racing sims should take. It’s the emperor’s new clothes. Don’t fucking fall for it, don’t fucking stand for it. Peace out

      Like

    3. hahaha, that was a good laugh hehe. don’t play it if you dont want, go play your favorite game then. But still doesn’t make true what you said.

      Like

  13. Forza 6 is a very boring and terrible racing game that is over hyped, weather isn’t dynamic neither is time of the day, broken setups, physics are mediocre and force-feedback sucks, can’t change field of view or seat position and they should make 900 degrees steering wheel animation or at least 360 degrees so when you use steering wheel controller you could see how both matches 1:1, it wouldn’t hurt your eyes.. ( currently in Forza 6 steering wheel of any in-game car, only rotates 90 degrees to either side) There are far better racing games out there. The graphics are fine…all in all a let down.

    Like

  14. Let’s hope that in the end it’s not just a way to buy FM6 for the console via the Windows Store, while being able to stream it from the Xbox One to the Xbox App in W10.

    Like

The comment box is not a toy.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s