Can We Move Past Publicity Stunts, iRacing?

member_big_pabloFor those who have been around the block a few times in the world of sim racing, iRacing has yet again attempted to place one of their prominent online personalities in the seat of a real world race car to try and somehow prove that their pricey software is the most realistic on the market, only to awkwardly shift gears and dance around what actually happened on the race track once the event commenced. It’s always a bit embarrassing to watch it play out, and if iRacing keep plugging away at these publicity stunts without realizing the damage it’s doing to sim racing, there’s going to be the wrong stigma associated with sim racing as a whole in legitimate paddock areas both amateur and professional.

It all started with Greger Huttu’s journey into the unknown. iRacing once believed they could throw the greatest sim racer of our time, otherwise known as the World’s Fastest Alien, into a Star Mazda entry for a few practice laps at Road Atlanta without even possessing a valid drivers license, and use his performance as proof that long hours on their simulation can indeed prepare you for the real thing. The on-track results really didn’t play into their favor. What was originally intended to be used as hard evidence that the iRacing motorsport simulation can absolutely prepare you for real world auto racing, instead indicated there was still work to be done on the simulation side of things, with Huttu clocking a lap time a few seconds off pace – a time basically any average person from your local indoor karting facility could achieve – and promptly pulling into the pits to throw up.

Continuing down the same path, iRacing attempted to produce a different result with the exact same experiment by placing three-time NASCAR iRacing Peak Anti-Freeze Series champion Ray Alfalla in the seat of a Spec Miata entry at Homestead-Miami Speedway, who rather than naturally adapting to the situation thanks to his time on iRacing instead spent most of the event getting accustomed to the Miata’s gearbox behavior – indicating iRacing’s transmission model was in no way realistic and hadn’t prepared him for much of anything, which sort of went against the whole goal of the publicity stunt.

In both scenarios, iRacing took the time to generate hype through YouTube videos and lengthy articles about a sim racer “getting a shot at the real thing” while using iRacing as a legitimate training tool prior to the event, only to display that the simulation was completely and utterly useless, because these hardcore sim racers with a long list of virtual accomplishments couldn’t even produce results on-par with a kid who inherited a small fortune after the passing of a relative, and blew most of it on a race car.

Unfortunately, we’re here to add Pablo Lopez to this list, and I want to start by saying this is one of the few guys on iRacing who actually deserves to have his fifteen minutes of fame in the spotlight; he’s a goofy Spanish lad who takes to being in front of a camera quite well, and has an instantly likeable personality on top of being one hell of a virtual driver. This is the exact kind of person I want representing sim racing to the outside world; not some kid dropping $20,000 USD of cash that wasn’t his on a fake race car cockpit and matching custom fire suit.

Through finishing well in an officially sponsored Mazda MX5 series on iRacing, and producing a compelling biographical video that could be marketed to potential sponsors, Lopez won the right to compete in Mazda’s 2016 Road to 24 event at NOLA Motorsports Park, which is more or less an invite-only time trial competition in the race-spec Miata typically reserved for some of the most talented SCCA drivers in the country all vying for a shot at a $100,000 Mazda Racing scholarship. The goal of this competition was quite simple: beat the shit out of everybody else on the property, and Mazda themselves will throw some serious dough at you to become a semi-professional race car driver under the Team Mazda banner.

It’s a pretty neat gig. And it would have been sweet if Lopez went out and held his own against the field of competitors. But he didn’t, because treating iRacing as a teaching tool to prepare you for the real thing, isn’t a very wise idea – the underlying physics just aren’t all they’re cracked up to be.

mazdamx5_iracing_2Through no fault of his own, Lopez obviously wasn’t very quick compared to the other drivers – most of which were seasoned SCCA racers with many years of experience to draw upon. And that’s to be expected in a competition such as this one; Lopez is essentially the equivalent of a walk-on student athlete just trying to hold his own against starters for the Alabama Crimson Tide or the Oregon Ducks. However, over the course of the ten minute event summary on YouTube, it eventually comes out from both other drivers and Lopez himself that he was essentially the slowest car on the property, couldn’t quite figure out the proper downshifting technique, almost wrecked the car on one occasion, and was just sort of there to be “that guy” who won a contest. Nothing against Pablo, as I said earlier this is exactly who I want representing sim racing to the auto racing community – he’s just the right mix of everything – but unfortunately he is now in the same boat as Huttu was at Road Atlanta, and Alfalla was at Homestead.

And this doesn’t really help iRacing’s underlying cause in the slightest. Hey man, if you’re going to go out on a limb and say you’re the most accurate racing simulator on the market, it’s cool, and I respect the balls it took to say that. Good for you for having faith in your product, you can collect your participant badge next Friday. But on three separate occasions, you’ve now tried to stuff accomplished sim racing personalities – some of the best online racers ever – into a legitimate race car, and it’s never translated into any sort of success. Your drivers are either throwing up, spinning out, or struggling with something basic like shifting gears. An accurate simulator should teach them how to do that. Y’all have some explaining to do as to why some of your best drivers appear to not be learning a damn thing from the software they’re supposedly training on.

maxresdefaultIs jealousy fueling this entry? Not in the slightest.

Like Pablo, I found myself in an entry level race car throughout the summer of 2016, and had absolutely no performance driving credentials to draw upon whatsoever – racing simulators were the only thing on my resume even remotely qualifying as “experience.”  Using software powered by the aging isiMotor engine as my primary means of education, and an ancient oval racing game that sometimes retails for $200 on eBay to perfect my pedal input rhythm, I found myself in the points lead by mid-season, only lost the championship due to a blown engine in the final race, and still brought home Rookie of the Year honors against several other drivers who were basically shoe-ins for the award. I’ve been able to write several articles detailing how I trained for my own racing endeavors using many different simulators on the market, and as a whole I personally didn’t find the transition from video games to some kind of amateur car to be all that difficult. If anything, I went out and proved that this once-unfathomable scenario of going from video games to the real thing is in fact a viable option.

For iRacers, on the other hand, this is suddenly asking too much. Despite laser scanned tracks, vehicle data straight from Mazda themselves, an experimental tire model built from years of research into how rubber behaves, modern force feedback effects designed to work with wheels that aren’t even affordable for most consumers, and a highly competitive environment where you’re asked to get every last tenth out of your virtual car just to hold a candle to your opponents, when an iRacer gets a shot at driving something in real life, they just can’t get the job done. And I’m at the point where I’m no longer pointing the finger at the driver or making excuses for their results – things like “well, Ray’s an asshole and Greger didn’t even have a drivers license” – because in this instance, I actually liked Pablo and wanted him to do well. He’s someone that’s marketable, someone I want to see paraded around the likes of VirtualR and RaceDepartment as the guy to represent us – all of us – to the outside world.

But he practiced on iRacing, and it obviously didn’t teach him anything of value.

iRacing need to stop with these marketing gimmicks until they’ve improved the simulation side of their software enough where it actually translates to satisfactory on-track results, otherwise it just looks incredibly fucking stupid. It’s not doing anybody any favors to hype up a story about a sim racer getting a chance to drive a real car thanks to iRacing, only for them to pull out of the garage area and basically poke around at the back of the pack with the same consistency and pace as someone who’s never even heard of iRacing. To the team in Massachusetts: these little vignettes don’t magically prove your game is realistic in the slightest, it just means someone understands the basic concept of pointing the steering wheel in the direction you want to go, and they’re trying not to hurt themselves.

80 thoughts on “Can We Move Past Publicity Stunts, iRacing?

  1. Anyone who seriously thinks iRacing or any other sim racing game is comparable to professional software used by racing teams is an idiot, period. These are entertainment products, and while they have some merit and can teach some racing skills, they just aren’t as accurate as a lot of people think.

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    1. iRacing is a shitty simulation. They claim their games to be of simulation value yet their fat nerd wimp customer base will never beat GT Academy participants. To drive a racecar you actually have to be fit.

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          1. iRacer Johnny Giundi just won GT Academy a few weeks ago, and only bought his PS4 after the competition had already started.

            Obviously fitness is important, but I’m not sure why console racers would be any more fit than their PC counterparts.

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    2. GT-Academy-Winners were winning the 12h of Bathurst in 2015 and second place this year. Florian Strauss for example did the jump from the Playstation to a Nissan GT3 in very short time like others. But i doubt Nissan is using GT as simulation when testing their candidates before they jump in the real car.

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        1. Strauss was karting before (who wasn´t?), but just for fun, not in races. He was also in the class-winning team at the 24h of Dubai during the first year of racing. I don´t see enough similarities between karts and GT3-cars. Karts are certainly better for getting into Formula classes, but GT3-simulations are more close when it comes to GT3-cars.

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            1. Only tried the Z4 GT3 in iRacing and i´m saying since months, that the telemetry in iRacing is wrong in nearly every aspect. Even pCars is far better. But good formula-drivers are not automatically good GT-drivers and the opposite.

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        2. I’m not sure anyone would suggest that iRacing, or any other sim, is sufficient preparation for actual racing, but you’ve conveniently some very successful transitions.

          Glenn McGee was iRacing’s first Mazda Road to Pro (or whatever it’s called) entrant, and eventually won the actual $100k scholarship, beating out a number of qualified road racers. He was the only sim racer, and doesn’t possess a karting background, nor any other real world racing experience.

          He was very competitive in the 2016 Mazda MX-5 Cup Global Challenge, finishing in the top ten, and second among rookies.

          Kamil Franczak later won the iRacing European MX-5 Cup, and performed very well in the one-off race at Laguna Seca a few months ago.

          I think you’ve also mischaracterized Huttu’s Road Atlanta test to suit your narrative. Flying in from Finland that morning, and having never driven a real car previously, he was able to get within a second or two of the lap record within a few laps. No karting experience either.

          I have no idea how accurate iRacing’s physics are, but a number of real world drivers do use the sim. Whether for training or fun, I don’t know, but they are there.

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      1. Who gives a flying fuck you faggot? The point is that GT Academy has a million times more prestige and financial backing than iWCGPS, NPAS and FSR combined. Last time I checked, the most famous winner in iRacing (Huttu) is still stuck being a fat turd playing a game of no simulation value with a steering wheel with all the FFB turned down in Middle of Nowhere, Finland. GT Academy winners are winning real life championships, faggot.

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        1. All these faggots on iRenting thinking that they won an actual Nascar or Blancpain championship… just LMAO! It’s called licensing, bitch!

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          1. iRacing GT3 isn’t even balanced you faggots, the fastest car is the one that they released the most recently, gameplay in iRenting is pay to play!

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            1. iR BlancPainintheass champioship:

              Mercedes AMG: 924 points
              BMW Z4: 519 points (Obsolete car faster than the R8??)
              Audi R8 LMS: 475 points
              McLaren MP4 12C: 186 points Almost Dead
              Ruf Rt(Fake Posh) DEAD
              Ford GT GT3 DEAD

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          2. and all these children including yourself, playing gran turismo thinking it’s a simulator. That can be very dangerous.

            you are a very aggressive young man. After you finish high school I hope your attitude changes. If it doesn’t you will have problems in life

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    1. Mmm… I got a wheel and shifter setup before buying my car, and that was my only practice before having to drive it to work with no real world experience. At the very least, it taught me the motions, but it did take a little while for me to stop dumping the clutch.
      After a while, you learn things in the sim you can use in real world, and vice versa.
      But yeah, purely relying on a sim is dumb, though I do give DR credit for making me comfortable with going very fast down tight twisty roads and attempting handbrake turns in a dirt lot near my house. And it’s a tight dirt lot, so if you don’t do it well you’ll hit the fence.

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  2. I’m starting production on various shifter mods using DualShock rumble motors for maximum realism in order to prepare the champions of tomorrow to excel right out of the gate (see what I did there). iRacers get 10% off with proof of a valid iRacing account worth more than 400$. Pre-order now. Subscription also available. Positive review is mandatory. No refunds.

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  3. I don’t understand all that fuss about going from a virtual seat to a real seat. I tought it was a placeholder for all of us that can’t race real cars(for various reasons). From there, the goal is to make it as close as possible. But hey, regardless of the software, it’s never going to be as good as the sound and smell of the metal!

    It doesn’t mean a software can’t be awesome tho! I mean, if i can choose between looking at a real race car on youtube, or test a pretty similar copy on a PC, the later is the better!

    Regardless of the sim used, something that really translate well, from both worlds is the mind game that comes with battling against an equally skilled driver.

    That’s the spirit of racing!

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  4. What about Glenn McGee? The guy who won the Mazda shootout last year coming from iRacing and finishing 11th overall in the standings with no actual racing experience prior. Funny how that got left out

    Liked by 1 person

  5. It’s definitely unfair to the guy to just toss him in a real Spec Miata with no seat time. The game may teach you how to race, and give a pretty good idea of the course, but no simulator is going to be close enough to the feel of driving a real car to make you instantly fast, you need time to learn exactly what it’s really like.

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  6. No offense James but there’s a difference between SCCA National Championship top level of driving and some dumbass shit box redneck short track racing. You aint a big shot. Most simracers from any sims would have gotten destroyed as well.

    The only guys who could have made some noise would have been ones with prior experience of some kind, even just track days. Pablo barely had anything frankly, hence why he was 2s off pace a Spec Miata champion (I mean, it’s not terrible, but yeah).

    The main problem with this competition is what Mazda asks out of you. Even if they pay for the championship fee and car, you have to pay for everything else, and that is still several grands, not counting possible damage, which is a big possibility trying to win those stupid draft lock races. If it wasnt for all the marketing crap and monetary question, I’d probably have gone for it, but fuck that.

    TLDR: Would be the same for any “green” simracers, all you’ve won is some shit redneck mobile short track thing, which has nothing to do with some of the biggest National level road racing championships.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Let’s be honest here, Pablo Lopez is nowhere near the level of Greger Huttu or Ray Alfalla, the guy’s just making fun YT videos about his hobby, and… that’s pretty much it.

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  8. We in the Alt-Right joke about the Holocaust a lot. This is because what we’ve been told about it – i.e. lampshades made of skin, soap made of fat, gas chambers disguised as shower rooms, and so on – is so nonsensical it deserves to be mocked. And we feel that humor and ridicule is a good way to counter these silly lies, as many people won’t have the time or inclination to read a bunch of boring and technical books and articles, but may be receptive to funny jokes.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. He could have practiced more with the Assetto Corsa Mazda MX-5 race car. Though it doesn’t have the tracks he needs, NOLA Motorsports Park.

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  10. At least they managed to qualify the Crashor Maldonado driver super license.

    Ok, roast me and my stupid lame joke. That joke is the only thing that expressing my opinion to iRacer driving a real race car. iRacing dev should look at the problems and fix the, regardless how-

    Oh, they are manchildren. They won’t us, anyway.

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  11. Im entering my 5th years as an iRacing member – hehe but Im not exactly an iRacer.
    Mainly because the iRacing tire model sucks.

    The behaviour of the cars at the crucial point where the car begins to slide is absolutely awfull and what is worse absolutely non realistic.
    Real iRacers have invented an euphemism to hide this fact by saying that “I got a tankslapper that did catapult me into the wall”.
    Because exactly at the tire adhesion point where it should be really fun and exciting to drive any racing car from gocarts over Formula Ford cars to F1 cars the iRacing tire model gives up and does
    surrender.
    The car does suddenly slide out first to one side and then often abruptly to the completely opposite side.
    Even very competent iRacers admit that these slides are impossible to save – oh man I got one of these tankslappers again.

    But in real life depending of which racing car we are talking about this initial sliding point should be the point where the drivers ability to control the car by flirting slightly with “going over the edge” (tire adhesion) will show how much of a competent driver he is.

    But this cannot be practiced in iRacing.
    Excactly because the area where the iRacing TM does function with any similarity to real world stops when the car begins to slide.
    The way the fastest iRacers practice is to get accustomed to keep the car excactly under this sliding point.

    It is more or less acknowledged by experienced simracers outside the iRacing congregation that the sim which simulates this crucial tire adhesion process most realistic is the rF2 TM and its not so ‎distant relative rF Pro.

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    1. I find you can save them with some funny countersteer and throttle usually. It doesn’t feel or even look right in the replay, but it works.

      I think you’re right though, this area of behavior is wrong in iracing.

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    2. I agree with the iRacing-physics, but AC, AMS and RR are doing a much better job as well. You can and need to go at the edge of limit and save possible slides if you want to win. iRacing is more about to avoid this point because you will spin out when getting there.

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    3. The part where it’s wrong is mainly how the tyres react after, heat sensitivity is weird and the devs know it.

      But…. Slides aren’t tricky unless you go overboard, the cars are quite controllable. You just need to actually have talent, something most people dont. Whether it’s due to just being bad, hardware setup like shit, etc.

      Same thing with real life drivers. Considering the lack of feeling when you go virtual, it takes time to get used to it, you cant really just jump in and expect to do well and everything translates smoothly, you have to learn a different set of feedback.

      The fact that everyone think they should be able to drive at the limit and slide and save everything like badasses (read: AC fans mostly, tho the new Formula on rF2 is pretty bad for that as well) is just messed up. I spend a lot of time around “amateur” racers and most of them are huge pussies when it comes to losing grip, and the rare times they slip up (because they go slow) they just lose it or just about manage it in a messy way. That simracers who barely know the basics think they should do better is quite weird, especially at much higher speed.

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      1. “The part where it’s wrong is mainly how the tyres react after, heat sensitivity is weird and the devs know it.

        But…. Slides aren’t tricky unless you go overboard, the cars are quite controllable. You just need to actually have talent, something most people dont. Whether it’s due to just being bad, hardware setup like shit, etc.”

        Kind of contradiction here.
        First. Yes there is a problem here – and the devs know it
        Second. No slides are not tricky – you just need to have talent.

        I have been driving FF1600 some years back. So I have probably more background to eveluate an unrealistic tire model than most:-)
        And I would think there is a reason that iRacing is the only sim where users have invented (and use) the euphemism tankslapper:-)

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        1. And I’m an alien in the sim, as well as being damn fast in real life (time attack). So there’s that. And considering “tankslappers” happen IRL I dont see the problem. Although the name isn’t quite accurate 🙂

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              1. Yeah, gotta put something on the trunk next, muh aero balance. FF1600s dont have wings anyway.

                Anyway, in normal driving iR feels better, pointier. But the big slip angles at least on the MX-5 are still ez mode. Like, 90deg kinda slides lol.

                Fucking noobs ruining simracing ;D

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  12. As someone who has been driving manuals for a long time and has recently got into sim racing with 3 pedals and an H-shifter, I’ve found that alot of sims don’t really seem to give a shit how you shift, especially on downshifts. Engine matching doesn’t seem to matter too much at all.

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    1. Agreed. On some cars it’s a bit worse but some it just doesn’t really make sense how lenient it is. Whether it’s iRacing or AC. Don’t play much of the others tho, maybe it’s the same as well. I tend to blip properly anyway haha.

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    2. Only so much they can do on the software side, there’s no way for toy shifters to lock you out from engaging a gear, so you never get a feel for that, and unless you run a motion rig, you won’t really notice if you do a jerky shift.

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  13. Anyone thinking that simracing can do something for you besides programming in your mind the routine of shift, brake, entry points etc is really clueless about this all. There is no way any sim and rig can even come close to the complexity of full motion inside a car, let alone a racing car – and even motion rigs actually work backwards in that regard! And I’m also sorry to say this to those who think force feedback wheels and hydraulic pedals are the ultimate, but not only are those items too simplistic, they also mostly produce the wrong kind of feedback and confuse the hell of you when you drive a real car (Or the opposite, depending on what you did first). So it’s no wonder that Lopez, Huttu and the rest are absolutely helpless in a real cars, because besides learning the track and routines, they have no feel whatsover about what a car at the limit is – simply because no sim can do that until we learn in some decades the tecnology to hijack our brain. Unfortunately that is the most crucial part of driving fast. Anyway I’m not willing to go at length about it in such a reply, maybe I do a guest article for James some day and in any case you can find enough of it in the internet if you are interested I guess.

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  14. I have raced in spec Mini series and another for Porsche 924s in the 1990s and it is very competitive at the front I finished 4th and 5th in the Championship and a few times professional drivers did some one off appearances and just about ran top 10 so anyone with limited experience in Karting or Iracing would struggle even after a days testing.

    The biggest difference between sim racing and the real thing is that seat of the pants feel that and real feedback through the steering that you just cannot get at home.

    And then you start racing other drivers…Club drivers who prepare and pay for their own cars are the cleanest drivers.Wealthy hotshots with someone else paying the bills are the worst.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yup. Byron William’s family is next door neighbors with Jimmie Johnson. He also was pretty decent (equipment or not) in legends and in Dale Jr’s Late Models.

        Which is just the thing most everyone racing today had a rich dad or family friend. It’s just a matter of who can actually drive out of that talent pool

        Liked by 1 person

  15. MX5 Miata on AC is not better than Iracing, LMFAO, that car is nothing like the real car, AC is fuckin turd, cant use it for practice before the real deal … no way in hell. One of the flaws is AC only have 1 LSD model simulated, clutch pack.. Dumb Stefano don’t even know how to simulate torsen used in the ND Miata, he said it himself in the official forum. Someone asked about caster, self centering and SAT, he ran to a corner behind his buddy who is a drift instructor, what the shit.

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    1. You wouldn’t know if the AC mx5 cup is like the real car when we saw that iracing practice doesn’t translate to how you operate a car in real life at high competition level. So you saying iracing is superior, is quite a ballsy statement, and probably false.

      “Someone asked about caster, self centering and SAT, he ran to a corner behind his buddy who is a drift instructor, what the shit.”

      That someone was asking if the physics on console contained the updated physics on those points. And btw, there wasn’t anything wrong with caster, the things they worked on months ago was the camber and sat. All these updates for consoles should be rectified on next update this month I believe, when the game version is on par with the pc.

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  16. rFactor2 offers a quality simulation experience that will prepare sim racers for real life racing situations, due to its highly advanced physics engine that is much more accurate than iRacing. No other racing sim comes close to the pure authenticy and accuracy of rF2’s physics engine.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. rf2 with the anatomic tyre model based on nuclear thermodynamical isotopes. rf2 is more advanced than CERN. Why are people investing billions on particle physics at CERN when they can run rf2 for 80bucks and simulate the big bang at 1200hz frequency.

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    2. I can downshift the Toyata Celica mod like machine gun F1 car..yeah No other racing sim comes close to the pure authenticy and accuracy of rF2’s physics engine.rf2 da best!

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  17. The real problem with iRacing is not the physics, it’s the fact that it’s too America-centric the rest of the world simply yawning when it hears about Nascar or Dirt track racing. Only white trashes, rednecks, and wimpy Canuck alt-right faggots like Austin are interested for these type of cuck motorsports.

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  18. Honestly I think this article was a bit harsh. 1-2 seconds off the pace compared to people with years of experience isn’t really too bad.

    You knock him for screwing up a downshift and spinning, and say that iracings physics didn’t prepare him for that, but what simulator does? You basically don’t have to rev match in rf2 at all so long as your going in a straight line. You can downshift early and utilize the engine braking with no negative consequences to the stability of the car. No sim does it really well atm.

    And as far as a simulator preparing you for real driving goes – off course it can. Obviously getting real world experience in combination with the simulator is superior compared with solely real world or solely simulator practice.

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  19. Whoever has a rl driving license, spent more then 10 hours behind the wheel of a real car, and still thinks iRacing is only remotely close to rl, is just an idiot. There is not more to that, period.
    Whoever thinks Dave Kämmer is remotely interested in making a realistic race sim is an even bigger idiot. iRacing is a business model, and is kept alive by marketing, period.
    Heck I still play Age of Kings once in a while, there is nothing wrong with iRacing itself.
    But making people believe it is replicating rl in any way, and that is what Kämmer does, is at least objectionable.

    Huttu, Alfalla, and whoever they are, they are good at a computer game, they are most talented in that, and have learned to make exactly the inputs the game requires.
    However, there is no resemblence with being a talented race car driver.
    Putting the worlds best counterstrike gamers into a SWAT team would prove similar results…

    And to top that off, even if those race sim aliens were blessed with real talent, they can not make up the lack of rl experience in a day.
    They should at least be given a minimum of 50 hours in a race car.
    But such will not happen, because they are only being used for marketing by iRacing, and at the lowest cost…

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  20. Nissan and GT Academy All day.
    Proof it can and does happen.
    But iracings problem is using only their top drivers in real cars.
    90% or more of sim racers don’t possess the bravery needed to step into a cockpit and go fast. Even though they likely have the spatial awareness And motor skills needed.
    It’s dumb to think every alien has the huge set of balls between his legs that is required.
    Use the Nissan and GT Academy method to include more talent and you get much better, and proven results.
    Iracing is just doing it wrong. Its a promotion,. Not a talent search. Has nothing to do with the software they run. If GTAcdemy can. So could they with the same format.
    They just don’t have a partner or plan. Just s promotion they foot the bill for themselves.
    Nobody cares, except you James, what their promotion might say about sim Racers. It’s just a promotion.
    People look to GTAcademy to see the current state of sim racer to actual cockpit racer experimentation.
    And it works great there. So kindly STFU About Iracings promotions. No one cares about how they reward their own aliens. And no one sees it as detrimental to sim racing perception. Except butt hurt members of the lifetime ban club.
    GTAcademy for the win.

    Like

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