Shockwave Arrives in Brick Rigs with Latest Update

812563367_preview_ss2016-12-04at11-27-17Originally conceived in the mid 1980’s by Les and Kent Shockley, the Shockwave Jet Peterbuilt has been a staple of airshows and International Hot Rod Association events for the better part of two decades, cramming three jet engines into the back of a purpose-built exhibition semi, producing over 36,000 horsepower and capable of speeds approaching 375 mph on a standard length airport runway. While the truck’s virtual debut may have come as a rival AI vehicle to be defeated in one of Microsoft’s Flight Simulator X’s Oshkosh Airshow missions, monster truck livery designer Ash Robertson has unveiled his stunning virtual recreation of the truck for the Steam Workshop portion of Brick Rigs, a relatively cheap physics sandbox fueled by blocks which are in no way related to the Lego toy company we introduced to the readers of PRC.net about a week ago.

The creation of Shockwave as it has appeared at race tracks in 2016 serves to highlight the new features present in an update released earlier today for Brick Rigs; one which brings airplanes, jet engines, and a multitude of new construction blocks to an indie game which has consumed our every waking moment since learning about the title. Application stability issues have also been ironed out with the latest update, allowing for some of the more elaborate creations available on the Steam workshop to function flawlessly within the game world without throwing a curve ball at your CPU when it explodes into a million pieces upon contact with a concrete wall.

810231397_preview_ss2016-12-01at09-35-28The rate at which Brick Rigs is being updated gives serious hope for the future of this title, as the game offers a lighthearted yet extremely deep approach to messing around with what are traditionally considered to be a children’s toys, removing the first person shooter element seen in other physics engine sandboxes  such as Garry’s Mod in favor of focusing exclusively on the construction and piloting of motorized vehicles. With online play already implemented, the Steam Workshop blowing up thanks to numerous high quality creations, and the possibility of a map editor on the horizon, we’re looking at what’s easily going to turn into the ultimate time waster for serious sim racers who just can’t shake their love of virtual race cars.

809638280_preview_ss2016-11-30at11-37-53

Advertisements

23 thoughts on “Shockwave Arrives in Brick Rigs with Latest Update

  1. James can you shill for this game any more than what you are doing?
    A fucking lego game and you’ve wet your panties about it like its the game of the decade!
    Are you for real?

    Like

    1. This game has more authentic drag racing than Assetto Corsa.
      And a day/night cycle.
      And multiple light sources (both trackside and from other cars)
      And snow/rain.
      And FWD/AWD support at launch, not added in via DLC.
      And free roam driving maps, which the AC community won’t shut up about.
      And multiplayer lobbies not segregated by DLC.
      And Steam Workshop support.
      And the ability to change steering lock per car.
      And support for six wheeled cars (Tyrrell P34 anyone?)
      And genuine Helicopter/Airplane support
      And chat that actually shows up for everyone instead of requiring you to open the python chat app manually.
      And non-scripted damage physics.

      If AC gets a 9.5/10 from IGN Italia, Brick Rigs would get a 27/10.

      Like

      1. I used to think you wrote these articles to bait a reaction from simracers, but after reading this site for a while I’ve realised you’re actually just this genuinely this big of an autist. Keep up the good work it’s entertaining for us at least.

        Like

      2. Maybe if you knew Brick Rigs was built on Unreal Engine 4 that natively supports most of those things and the devs don’t need to code for it…
        AC engine/software as is by most other sim engines they all are custom made for necessity. Assetto Corsa had FWD since the early days because of the Abarth 500, so this already tells about your knowledge. They didn’t have any AWD car back in the day.

        But as is usual of you, you can’t distinguish between simulation games where the driving behind the wheel is realistic and between games with some fancy features that are just casual sandbox games. It isn’t strange after all, you consider higher the console simcade racing games over the advanced simulation racing games.

        Like

  2. Is incredible how you overlook all the negatives and faults in the game/software and focus on the goods and sensations it gives you. This simply means you like the game and you’re happy.
    Let this be a lesson that’s how many people feel when they play sim racing games you don’t like and constantly throw shit at. They aren’t fanboys, they aren’t shills, those that play the game actively like it and are happy doing it. Just please don’t be blind when those “fanboys” and “shills” are the first to point faults, bugs, and offer suggestions. Is not fair at all. The bugs and errors you see in the AC forums are from people that play the game, and the updates are from the devs who read and understood those reports. You don’t play the game, you don’t like it, therefore you don’t contribute with anything good. People in the comments need to call you to reason constantly and you never learn to do just judgements and quality research. All your Assetto Corsa articles have been based on speculation, hear and say, and bad research about the topic. Either you listen to this criticism or you don’t.

    Like

    1. Well see, I bought Brick Rigs expecting a half finished, half-assed Lego game that barely worked even at its best – assuming it would be a thirty minute diversion. Instead, I got a physics engine so robust it actually calculates the weight of each brick individually, determines your vehicle’s center of gravity and traction based on your build layout, allows you to run a full 1/4 mile drag system complete with working tree & scoreboards, on top of a full day/night cycle + weather system, and much more.

      Oh, and in the same game, I can bust out a tank and destroy an entire city before switching to a kart I downloaded off the steam workshop and hit sick jumps.

      I bought Assetto Corsa expecting a somewhat competent racing simulator that would succeed the original rFactor. Instead, I got a DLC fest with basically no features found in the original rFactor, and some bald italian guy on the forums started calling everyone mentally ill for questioning why shit like pit stops hadn’t been implemented in the game. Then, after months/years of people saying “it’s Kunos, they’re going to support the hardcore community and add things we requested”, they went and released a console version – something nobody wanted – that basically did nothing other than damage their reputation.

      Like

      1. “Instead, I got a physics engine so robust it actually calculates the weight of each brick individually, determines your vehicle’s center of gravity and traction based on your build layout, allows you to run a full 1/4 mile drag system complete with working tree & scoreboards, on top of a full day/night cycle + weather system, and much more.”

        Hello assosiasor 2.0 Shill me some more rBricks 2

        Like

      1. Thats pretty good. I just want to race japanese econoboxes against each other and no modern games let me set up my own races. Have to go back over a decade for that hitech feature.

        Like

  3. Honestly, I’ve been looking for something like this for a while: a game where you can build cars in a relatively simple manner, but where your decisions actually affect how it drives, and then race them. Any others of this type?

    Like

  4. That’s the low-downforce version of Shockwave which only ran at Le Mans.

    Call me when they get the high downforce quarter mile version, this one has no simulation value.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. This article reads more like a Brick Rigs press release and feature list than an article about some guy clicking some bricks together in the shape of a drag car. I wonder why James never covered the simracing modding scene with this level of enthusiasm. “Patrick Giranthon is a hero for knowing how to correctly apply material settings, we like this cluelessly lost modder because he’s throwing a tantrum at a developer we don’t like, and this looks kinda like the Shockwave Jet. What a STUNNING virtual recreation.”

    James has now found lego to satisfy his autism. I’m Looking forward to the part where after playing Brick Rigs for more than 300 hours while raving about it to everybody, he stops playing it entirely, decides it’s a piece of shit scam, and launches PretendBricks.net to reveal how totally fucked up the autism bricks community is for daring to enjoy themselves.

    Roll on the Brick Rigs praise articles and nonsense comparisons with simracing so that people can realise James’s taste in racing games is so wildly specific that his feelings don’t apply to literally a single other consumer, that he has a worse understanding of the process of videogame development than the average gamer and is willfully ignorant about it, and that he ultimately doesn’t understand why exactly people enjoy simracing at all.

    Every simracing game is a scam, I should know because I don’t play them anymore. Go buy Brick Rigs and Sebastien Loeb Rally Evo©. Does Playing With Hot Wheels on the Carpet Deliver What We’ve All Been Searching For?

    Like

    1. “Roll on the Brick Rigs praise articles and nonsense comparisons with simracing so that people can realise James’s taste in racing games is so wildly specific that his feelings don’t apply to literally a single other consumer, that he has a worse understanding of the process of videogame development than the average gamer and is willfully ignorant about it, and that he ultimately doesn’t understand why exactly people enjoy simracing at all.”

      +1000 to you. Really, what is the point of this blog if is just to circlejerk over simcades and fun sandbox games and despise every sim. But hey, the pretend race cars now actually makes sense, since he only likes pretend race cars and can’t deal with the advanced simulated cars. We see it after every “physics exposed” article he posts, zero clue. So just stick to your pretend race cars, literally, and leave simulation to those that know and not just pretend to know.

      Like

  6. Doesn’t suprise me that James likes this game since kids with autism are often really good at building lego models in new and unique ways.

    Like

  7. Meydam states that Legos “offer a highly routine, repetitive, structured form of play that many children with autism find appealing.” Children with Autism often like activities that are to be performed a specific way and many children with Autism have cognitive abilities that allow them to complete a step by step process of building a Lego creation. Others benefit from the opportunity for creativity development with the infinite possibilities that Legos allow.

    Research on Lego play therapy was recently conducted at the University of Cambridge. This study focused on children with both Autism and Asperger Disorder, and found that children who participated in Lego therapy showed improvement in social skills.

    Has this game been good therapy for your autism?

    Like

Ratio of vowels to consonants will be monitored. Post at your own discretion.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s