Why I Chose Not to Return to iRacing

I apologize in advance for the endless shit-slinging this will cause, but many in our comments section have been asking for this article to be written at some point, and today seemed like a good idea to address the topic given certain semi-related discussions popping up in the official iRacing member forums.

Most of the iRacers who hang around PRC undoubtedly know me as the guy who was permanently banned from iRacing and has some sort of “evil vendetta” against the company, and depending on who you ask, the stories will vary from modest “he was a cunt on the forums & used up his final strike”, to elaborate musings that showcase the creative writing talents of sim racing’s finest madmen. Regardless of where you stand on the whole PRC vs. iRacing thing, now that the hatchet has been buried (in a way), I can safely say that I was removed from the service for posting a negative review of the simulation that gained traction within the sim racing community. Lots of questions will arise from that statement, so I’ll do my best to answer them in an abbreviated manner which allows us to progress onward with the article.

iRacing has the finest marketing team in sim racing, and they care deeply about their brand. This is not a bad thing, but it means that if you as a content creator have not been satisfied with a recent update or release, and your content happens to gain a bit of a following and people start agreeing with what you have written, the organization will do their best to make sure this internal and external dissent with the game doesn’t continue to spread – especially with some of the partners & sponsors iRacing has attained throughout the years looking on. iRacing is a very large community of like-minded sim racers coming together to participate in an exclusive online racing country club, so having one guy in there who not only could run wild with FRAPS and the Print Screen key, but could articulate the service’s shortcomings in a way that made their efforts look decidedly amateurish, the solution is pretty simple – get rid of that one guy who is diligent enough to expose it all. I’m not saying it’s right, but I at least understand their perspective.

Thankfully, a rival developer appreciated this kind of diligence rather than actively suppressed it, and as a result now I have a cool job and a race car sponsorship to boot.

The sunk cost fallacy of sim racers not willing to part with hundreds of dollars in vehicles and locations over their opinions of a new car or recent patch, coupled with behind the scenes relationships most content creators big and small share with iRacing, are the reasons you will not see any YouTube personalities or sim racing media outlets publish wholly negative pieces on the simulation – only retrospective, stealth comments such as “the new build’s tires are miles ahead of the previous iteration and actually feels connected with the road,” which hold implications that the previous build of the game was a nonsensical pile of shit that didn’t drive like a real car in the slightest. I was essentially the guinea pig to figure out where that exact threshold lay. The nice part of this story, is that after months upon months of waiting around to see what would happen next, considering I had nothing to show for the $993 Canadian spent on content within iRacing, I was indeed given a full refund and a proper apology for my run-in with iRacing’s aggressive marketing strategy. Yes, the rumors are true, iRacing does hand out refunds, though I have to state they only do so in select special circumstances. You certainly can’t start bombarding support staff with complaints about the tire model and hope they reimburse you for two weeks wasted on a racing simulator you didn’t like – that’s not how it works. In my situation, I hadn’t heard from the staff in eighteen months, circumstantial evidence was starting to build a legitimate case in my favor, and we still continued to cover iRacing anyways, because unlike the rumors claiming I write under multiple accounts, we actually did have a guy involved in their $10,000 championship – and still do. So their ban accomplished precisely nothing in the long run, other than hold about a thousand dollars from a customer while denying access to the money he had spent for saying things they didn’t agree with on the internet. Oops.

However, what most people aren’t aware of, is that I was given the choice to return.

Here’s why I didn’t.

In the event that you’ve been living under a rock for the past month, or haven’t noticed the obvious banner change at the top of the page that depicts a very real race car as opposed to the pretend race cars we obsess over, I’ve been sponsored by another major sim racing developer to campaign a stock car that sends almost 500 horsepower to the rear tires. This isn’t a test session or a publicity stunt where I’m on a closed circuit for a few laps and they speed up the footage to make it seem like I was going faster than I was, this is the real deal.

Part of why I landed this gig was because I performed well in an entry level class, and the main reason I was able to be instantly competitive out of the box in said entry level class despite no prior racing experience was thanks to my time spent in certain simulators. Don’t get me wrong, I hated every minute of driving WTCC touring cars in RaceRoom Racing Experience because dear God front wheel drive cars fucking suck, but that shit paid off on day one when my car owner sent me sideways into turn three for a laugh, and I had one shot to get it right. Instead of shooting face first into the concrete wall, I went out and won Rookie of the Year, and almost won the championship had it not been for two separate engine explosions. Bragging? Sure, go ahead and call it that, whatever, but it also speaks volumes about how this software can be used as a genuine training tool, provided you know how to translate what you learn in a simulator into the actual car.

iRacing features what’s basically our exact car in the software – two variants, if you want us to be specific. There’s the Super Late Model (left), and the Sportsman Late Model (right), which to our European readers who aren’t well-versed in stock car racing, it’s like comparing a GT3 entry to a GTE car – same basic premise; one is an evolution of the other. So on the outset, iRacing would appear to be the prime candidate for a personal training tool – tons of short tracks (some of which we might race at in the future), an abundance of online competition, and what’s supposedly the greatest simulated race car physics available to consumers. Why would anyone turn down the opportunity to return to this software after being mistreated by the organization?

The answer is one word: Tires.

My real world crew chief this year is Ryan Luza’s virtual crew chief, whose team has swept the first three rounds of iRacing’s Peak Anti-Freeze championship, not to mention winning some absurd number like nine out of eleven races in the iRacing Pro Series this past winter.  Together, they have found some shit when trying to gain that extra tenth of a second on their opponents, who are vying for the same $10,000 USD cash prize.

Since iRacing’s New Tire Model experiment, which began in August or September of 2011, one oddity in the underlying tire physics have always remained a constant: the tires do not take kindly to generating any sort of heat. Ever wonder why your first lap at speed is always the fastest, and the car drops off like a rock afterwards? Cold tires are faster. I’ll let you process that for a second.

The more you heat up your tires, the less grip you have, which means unlike how a real driver would go out and properly work in their set of racing slicks to optimal grip levels before plateauing for a few laps and then proceeding to naturally fall off, iRacing’s tires operate best at room temperature, and get progressively worse in what feels like a linear fashion from zero until they liquefy at a temperature of 230 – which is where the iRacing death slide so many cars exhibit comes from. Once a tire hits that magic number on the nose, the car immediately tries to kill you.

This is actually a problem that dates back to IndyCar Racing II; a specific temperature was hard-coded into the tire model (which varies from game to game depending on the racing series depicted) to determine when the tires considered to be at a state of overheating, and the car would instantly break loose if the tires were at that precise temperature or above. Papyrus titles have always made use of this concept – and surprise, it’s the same guy behind all of the tires – though NASCAR Racing 2003 Season does the best job at providing a convincing, natural heating and cooling cycle, whereas the issue is most noticeable in IndyCar Racing II thanks to the fact that you’re traveling upwards of 230 mph and putting ridiculous G-loads on ultra-lightweight single seaters.

What this means, is that with iRacing failing to fix how cold tires are inexplicably faster than hot, sticky tires, as a driver I can’t use iRacing to practice how to work in a set of racing slicks or learn to deal with a tire’s natural life cycle, because any kind of tire heat in iRacing is detrimental to your car’s performance, and I’d basically have to unlearn everything I know about tire life and management just to be competitive in iRacing – which certainly isn’t how a racing simulator is supposed to work.

Long before we announced our 2017 season plans, when putting together the car was just a secret Teamspeak thing that only a few people knew of, Dustin sent me this video of late model driver Ty Majeski lighting up the tires before his qualifying run at New Smyrna in February, with “do this when you go out” attached to the link. Burnouts aren’t for show, they serve a purpose – to heat up the tires and give you substantially more grip on an otherwise dormant race track.

If you want to be fast in iRacing, here’s something that might cause problems: do the opposite – crawl around the race track at fifteen miles per hour, only accelerating on the final stretch of asphalt to give you a flying start at the timing line. I don’t care whether you’re at Road Atlanta, Bristol, or the Watkins Glen – coast around the track at school zone speeds for your outlap if you want to knock a few tenths off your personal best. Tires are so sensitive to any kind of heat, wasting time on a Power Wheels out lap is genuinely worth the extra minute or two spent looking like a dumb-ass on the apron.

I can’t say I’m too keen on abandoning real-world racing skills and techniques to run bogus out laps and pussy-foot around the track on tires that loathe heat and elasticity, when my real car will ask me to generate heat and sidewall flex to produce results on the track. Just think of how much that would fuck up my driving style, not to mention how iRacing’s poster-boy Dale Earnhardt Jr.’s,suspiciously seemed to suffer a career-defining slump from the summer of 2008 to the summer of 2012, during the exact time-frame he was an incredibly active user on the iRacing service?

But that’s just the qualifying process we’ve covered.

A couple weeks back I got to watch an iRacing Peak-Anti Freeze Series event from the virtual spotters box, witnessing how a top level sim team operates in a points-earning championship round. Now a lot of iRacing members around the 1000 to 2500 iRating range outright accuse Ryan Luza of hacking because the guy has been on an absolute tear starting with last winter’s Pro Series, but the answer to his on-track prowess has nothing to do with third party hacks, but rather issues with iRacing itself.

As I’ve outlined above, any strain on the tire which could generate heat is a bad thing in iRacing, and that includes minuscule stuff you otherwise wouldn’t think of, like sidewall flex and general tire slip – which is almost unavoidable while racing at competition speeds. As you accelerate out of a corner on any oval track, the car pivots on the right rear tire, causing forces to be exerted on the sidewall or the vehicle to sway around a bit, and thus, generating heat. This is what you strive to achieve in a real car, as balancing on the sidewall separates an average driver from a great driver, but again, you don’t want to do this in iRacing because it produces heat, and tire heat slows you down. The dance that racing legends such as Ayrton Senna perfected during their time on this planet driving enormously over-powered vehicles cripples you in iRacing, because that’s both how sensitive the tires are to heat, and how detrimental heat is to tire performance & overall speed.

What Ryan has been doing, in combination with slick setups from one of PRC’s own masterminds, is being so gentle on the throttle, in some instances he’s almost coasting by people on corner exit, when they are steadily applying power. The net gain from driving in a hyper-conservative fashion in which there is no wheelspin, slip, or sidewall flex whatsoever – a pace that would see you several laps down in real life – offsets any loss in raw speed and abuses iRacing’s incomprehensibly broken tire model that punishes you for putting heat into your tires as a real race car driver would, because you’re driving so slow the tires aren’t gaining heat – and therefore being rewarded for it. Don’t hate the player, hate the game.

This all combines to create a driving style so nonsensically backwards, in which you are forced to crawl around the track during out laps at school zone speeds and then drive as slow as you can in a competition environment, being careful to never get up on the sidewalls or apply the throttle unless the car is pointed perfectly straight. Figuring out how to be successful with this style is part of the problem – if you want to win races in iRacing, what you’ve learned about how real cars like to be driven at the limit no longer applies, so you’re forced to develop an entirely new set of skills which intrude on the old ones. If I had a nickel for every time Dustin hit the track in CART 88 testing and knocked down a wall because iRacing made him forget that you need to do this crazy thing called working heat into the slicks before you can push at maximum attack, I’d have a Subway Steak & Cheese combo on my lap.

I’d prefer if this scenario didn’t happen in a real car.

So if you’re in a situation such as myself – which admittedly won’t be everyone, so don’t stop playing iRacing because PRC told you to – where you’re now looking around for simulators to help refine the muscle memory for the upcoming season, everything you do to go fast in iRacing and participate in their high level online competitions, would not transfer over into the real car – you’d be ungodly slow, and in some cases a hazard to your fellow drivers, as real tires don’t shrivel up and die after a lap; they rely on organically generated heat to become sticky, and managing sidewall flex is part of what makes performance driving an art form.

Aston Martin GTE driver Nicki Thiim describes the exact same tire behavior issues I’ve discussed above at the 5:37 mark in the video below:

To pull a direct quote from the video:

The GT3 cars [are] so easy to overheat the tires… Again the only thing I don’t like on iRacing is the tire model right now, its too sensitive to how you use it. Like, if I go sideways in one corner, you can be sure the next corner I will be the drift king of Japan.

Don’t even get me started on how iRacing’s Super Late Model drives; if Goodyear sold tires that went from ungodly tight to wrecking loose in three laps (or about a minute of driving), the company would be out of business in a month.

Stuff like this is why my mind is blown when I see marketing pieces and message board babble proclaiming iRacing to be the be all, end all of auto racing simulators, and how an abundance of real world drivers are using it to sharpen their skills in off weeks due to the unmatched authenticity it offers, or whatever buzzword they’re using this month. Though the dirt content is objectively good, in most other cases, using iRacing to train for any high horsepower asphalt car car would be a surefire disaster, as the way racing slicks have been modeled to behave goes against everything you would do out on a physical race track, and would put you in real, actual danger that could physically harm yourself or your wallet, if you attempted to apply the very same driving style and techniques in a proper race car. This may explain why the prominent iRacers given private test sessions for their in-game prowess have traditionally not paid off in the intended fashion.

In a real car, regardless of the class or discipline, you’re encouraged to warm the tires on your outlap in creative ways, and on corner exit push so hard you’re dancing the car on the external tire sidewalls, flaring the rear end outwards ever so slightly while centering the wheel and allowing the vehicle to float towards the edge of the racing surface. In iRacing, the top championship events are won by turning an out-lap at rollerblading pace, then driving so slow the sidewalls are never once called upon, and the vehicle remains completely neutral at all times to minimize heat accumulation.

For a piece of software whose mission statement is to be the ultimate racing simulator, yet has the potential to ruin my own driving style by forcing me to adapt to a car that doesn’t make any logical sense to drive, thanks, but no thanks. I’ll pass on that one.

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123 thoughts on “Why I Chose Not to Return to iRacing

  1. Say whatever you want.. iRacing is the best sim for people that want to race against other people..

    End of story..

    It’s not perfect.. but what is in this day and age?

    Disclaimer: This post was not sponsored by Slightly Mad Studios

    PS.. One less douchbag on iRacing can only be good for the rest of us!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Confirmation bias is a bitch, isn’t it? Enjoy the superbly flawed “sim”. Indeed the actual online component is by far the best available but oh lord at what a cost. I really hope they can fix the broken tire model.. but I’m not keeping up hope as it’s been so many years now and almost none of the fundamental flaws have been fixed or even acknowledged.

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      1. Good article James – and your iRacing TM remarks are spot on.
        God Kaemmers advanced tiremodel is a piece of junk.

        “I really hope they can fix the broken tire model.. but I’m not keeping up hope as it’s been so many years now and almost none of the fundamental flaws have been fixed or even acknowledged.”

        Hehe after 4+ years I was so fucking stupid to extend my membership 1 year more.
        But iRacings cars does still create unsaveable “tankslappers” when you try to drive like a real car.
        So no more extending membership for me:-)

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        1. I have over 300$ worth of tracks and cars in the system. Haven’t renewed my subscription in over a year though.. but I must confess, it’s very tempting every time there is a new update. I keep hoping for the best. I really like the way the racing, irating and especially safety rating system is setup.. and the online component (when servers aren’t crapping out) is vastly superior to anything else out there. So personally I still hope iRacing gets it “right” so that I can finally enjoy all the content I own.

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    2. @Flog

      Please do as a favor and go die – such dumb people like you need to be removed from this world and not able to reproduce

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      1. Your parents had an asshole of a kid. Why weren’t they stopped from reproducing?

        Look, you may not like what he says or whatever, but sure as hell other people don’t like who you are or what stuff you do. Maybe we should also stop you from reproducing? Think about it.

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  2. Another thing..

    I’m pretty sure that 99% of the people using iRacing do so to have some fun and enjoy driving some pretty damn awesome tracks they otherwise wouldn’t be able to..

    To this end i would say iRacing have a fantastic product and know their target market.. We’re not all arrogant dick heads that think that a drive in some shitbox oval car in some amateur league driving tracks no one’s ever heard of entitles them to being some sort of expert.. Let me know when you get a drive for Hendricks.. then I’ll listen to what you have to say..

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    1. Yeah, I guess cause Nicki Thiim (an Aston Martin GTE driver & Le Mans 24 Hour winner) saying the exact same stuff I have about tire behavior in iRacing doesn’t count because he doesn’t drive for Hendrick.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. Nicki Thiim is also on the sim everyday (and thankfully not a prick anymore), and certainly hasn’t suffered for it (recent Porsche Supercup champ as well as WEC GTE champ).

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          1. How could anyone think that Nicki’s real-world driving skills have anything to do with…iRacing? His skills long predated his involvement with iRacing and are retained via constant real-world reinforcement. He likely compartmentalizes the exploits/bullshit he has to do in iRacing.

            Which is fancy way of saying: “An F1 driver can play a few games of Ridge Racer and not be harmed by it”.

            He probably thinks of iRacing the way I think of Forza Horizon: Just a fun racing-themed arcade game with a social element.

            OTOH, Austin is still trying to *learn* how to drive a high-powered RWD with slicks for the 1st time. Given that he doesn’t already have thousands of hours of experience driving such a car IRL, iRacing would be worse than useless. As he says in the article, it would teach him how *not* to do it.

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            1. Most pros who like sims for training are not using them to learn how to drive. They are using them for track knowledge and to build or maintain concentration. Plus to have some fun. IRacing has terrific track accuracy and selection plus a lot of competition with longer races so they can meet those objectives easily. They could certainly get most of that from some other sims too but the tracks are usually best in iRacing. I actually think their extensive time in real cars makes them care less about the accuracy then some people who never get to experience a real race car. So they might try rfactor 2 and say yes this is more realistic but the track selection and accuracy will hold a title like that back for a professional drivers objectives even if the handling feel is superior.

              I agree the tire model heating is an issue but the article makes it sound like there is no grip on lap 2. Grip may fall off instead of building but it isn’t immediately like night and day.

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  3. What game is there to actually practice stock cars? It can’t be rf2 due to tires and track tech, such thing doesn’t exist in AC, if even that game could support it, and pCARS is a joke.

    Do you play ARCA or rf1 oval mods? Or NR 2003? Or even GT5 with all assists turned off?

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    1. NASCAR 03 and the original ARCA Sim Racing content are both pretty good.

      GT3 stuff has roughly the same power-to-weight ratio. There’s also the Swedish Camaro Cup cars that I’ve converted into Automobilista.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Were you able to get around the Camhack issue on W10? You may want to consider doing another partition with a different Windows, just for pre-Dx12 games if you haven’t.

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  4. Project Cars has the most accurate tire model of any modern racing sim. I have spent countless hours toying around in the garage menu to find that extra thousandth out on the track and I can assure you this is the secret weapon Mercedes and Lewis Hamilton use to find their setups before every race. When Project Cars 2 comes out it is going to be the last sim ever made because there will be nothing to improve upon.

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    1. I agree, did you know that Lewis Hamilton’s brother said Project Cars has the best possible tyre model with all possible simulation value. The perfection SMS achieved will only be surpassed by the sequel, meanwhile the iRenters will still be paying ever-increasing monthly fee’s to drive around on their glorified arcade game. With constant wrecking in every single race, tyres made of ice, and a force feedback system that’s so broken everyone who plays the game has to turn it off.

      Thank god for SMS providing PC Gamers with true simulations without them we would all still be playing Need For Speed and Brick Rigs. Praise be to Austin and Ian Bell.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Banned from iRacing again? 😉

    Seriously though, to anyone who defends this “sim” anymore, you’re doing yourself and everyone else on the “service” harm. Stop encouraging or making exceptions to poor tires. Tires are one of most important parts of sim racing, and iRacing is extremely poor in this category. Hold them accountable for it.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Hey look its joenathan here, how about you go make another rf2 (marketing) video. No wonder the shills of sim racing are buddies, one advertising for rf2 and the other for pcars2.

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      1. Did you actually watch his videos? They’re quite even-handed and plus – he’s right. rF2 may be ugly and devoid of any structure, but it’s feature-complete, the physics/FFB are great and the AI is in a class of its own.

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  6. youre driving a SLM?? don’t know jack about ovals but that’s always been my favorite model…surely this means we’ll be seeing one in pC2?

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  7. Look.. I’m not here to defend iRacing.. I play all the sims currently available and just happen to have some opposing thoughts to James Austin..

    I’m 100% sure that iRacing are not trying to rip people off or put out content that is deliberately broken.. That is just ridiculous and doesn’t even need discussion..

    Also.. referring to iracing as some sort of exclusive country club is equally as ridiculous and is more likely a contruct created by your own personal worldview than that of the greater iracing population..
    The people i race against down in the sub 2000 iR minnows have anything but that point of view and are most certainly there to have a few races.. have a good time.. and hopefully learn something new and improve a little each race.. The only people i’ve come across who think that they are above everyone are the douchbags with the 5000+ iR who obviously spend every waking moment on the service and think they’re entitled to an automatic first place every race.. (i’m sure you fall in to this category Jimmy!)

    Regarding the tire model.. yes it’s not realistic on most of the cars.. but it is certainly improving.. the 911 and subsequent tire updates on the GT3 cars are a big step forward.. they are trying..

    Regarding the overarching theme that iRacing users are being ripped off… This is THE MOST RIDICULOUS thing.. iRacing is an expensive sim and an expensive hobby.. of that there is no question.. BUT.. access to an initial short term subscription for a very low price is available to everyone.. here they can sample a great deal of what the service has to offer..
    The users of iRacing are all consenting adults who are willingly paying for whatever content they choose to purchase (or rent as you like to say).. try one thing at a time.. it’s not fair to say i spent $1000 on iracing and i feel ripped off.. That’s just proving you’re fucking retarded..

    I too have raced real cars (touring cars) and $1000 will buy you one pair of rears for 3 laps of qualy! –
    How are you gonna feel when you qualify at the back? Cry: i want my money back #bitch

    It is what it is.. you can drive the MX5 and the old V8 and the caddy and see that the car handles nothing like it’s real world counterpart.. if you choose to buy more cars and find it’s more of the same.. it’s on you.. not on iRacing..

    If you go to Burger King and try a few of their burgers and hate them.. do you keep on going and buy them all thinking…”no this one will be amazing..!!”….? Fuck no.. but if you do.. it’s not Burger Kings fault.. You’re the idiot!

    Most people like burger king.. and iRacing must be doing something right because after all.. they are widely acknowledged as the premier online racing service (whether it’s tire model is realistic or not).. a good marketing campaign only goes so far if you don’t have the product to back it up..

    Regardless of the tire model.. iracing have the best tracks, some of the best car modelling, the best audio, and the code is pretty fuckin optimised..

    I honestly keep trying to love RF2, AMS, R3E, AC… but i keep coming back to iRacing coz i can race against real people in the best VR environment (by far)..

    I am totally ranting and looking like a shill.. (i still like driving AMS most but no VR = no go) so i will shut the fuck up now..

    But.. you made the point that driving iracing could potentially result in picking up some bad habits for driving a race car in the real world.. and this should worry us..
    But as previously stated.. probably less that 1% of people who use iRacing will end up in a real race car in competition.. it’s a moot point..

    All sim racing aliens are only good at driving a bunch of pixels around a pretend track coz that’s all they do, day in day out.. To get good at sim racing.. you have to practice SIM racing.. To get good in a real car.. you need to practice in a REAL CAR… laps laps laps..

    And before you bring up the whole.. formula one driver etc use simulators.. yeah… and they’ve been Karting since they were in their daddy’s balls..!

    Out.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. “I honestly keep trying to love RF2, AMS, R3E, AC…”

      I see this BS comment all the time among the iRacing community and I wish you’d all just stop. No you fucking don’t bother with other sims, you pick them up once and try them for an hour before declaring them useless and not worth your time.

      The country club thing is a real thing with a lot of iRacers i’ve known, the fee’s involved inevitably force some weird sense of entitlement over a lot of there users. And honestly, it wouldn’t bother me so much if not for the fact that people like you come onto various forums saying you’re cool with everything, but iRacing Bro!, and then acting impartial. I’m not saying that the entire iRacing community is guilty of this but there are enough of you vocal folks to make some waves.

      It’s like the sim racing equivalent to saying you’re not racist and you have a black friend. Just don’t.

      Liked by 2 people

    2. @Flog

      Please do as a favor and go die
      Such dumb people like you need to be removed from this world and not able to reproduce

      Youre an iRacing fanboy – iRacing’s marketing created an atmosphere of sects – other opinions are forbidden – the truth is getting supressed like crazy

      iRacing = Cancer & wasted money … they never properly fix the tire model until they fire the guy responsible and hire a new competent team for it with proper experience (ie. rF2)

      Yes they do it on purpose, they do bring on purpose broken content, cause they support it with marketing nonsense / lies and are obviously not willing to fix it PROPERLY
      So it is deliberate!

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  8. You could “dance” on the original tire model. Then they started marketing iracing 2.0, it had horribly broken tire model but all the fanboys wouldn’t shut up how good it was so there was no coming back. Fast forward 7 years and numerous patches to the tire model and some cars are starting to behave like the OTM but still all of them have nonsensical I-M-O temps.

    I was banned on the forums for pointing out this.

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    1. “Fast forward 7 years and numerous patches to the tire model and some cars are starting to behave like the OTM but still all of them have nonsensical I-M-O temps”.

      At least you are correct in this part.
      Both the temperature rise and specially the I-M-O temps were spot on in good old NR2003/OTM and its mods.
      The temps was actually useable for camber tweaking in NR2003 where these temps are absolutely not useable to anything in iRacing/NTM.

      Hehe and different staff explanations about this fact are sooo entertaining.:-)

      Liked by 1 person

  9. When I was critical of Ira sings tire model I was told I was stupid broke couldn’t drive of course that’s not true and now it’s quite apparent that I racing is shit

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      1. It’s probably a mountain of things you don’t know anonymous but what you should know is I’m using Google Voice and it is one pathetic fucking piece of shit equipment although amazingly it is actually fucking output it word for word here

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  10. How many words can you spend on this?

    iRacing has a shit tyre model, this was so 8 years ago, and it still holds true. Among the niche of die hard sim racers that is a well known fact. Even iRacers themselfs admit to the shortcomings of the physics engine.
    Tiff Needel from fifth gear has commented on iRacing with the words “i dont like it, it is not realistic” not giving it any more time and mention, dissed it within seconds.

    Do not bloat as this being your great discovery.
    We all know about this for a long time. gfx is outdated, physics suck badly, but the multiplayer aspect is unmatched to this day.
    Also iRacing shortcomings do not take away from its appeal. Being good at iRacing is still hard, and an achievement in itself. Racing is about competing against each other, and as far as racing sims go, you can only do this in a controlled, regulated, and supervised environment with iRacing.

    The only fault one can blame iRacing with, would be their marketing strategy. But then again, whos to fault really?
    Somebody who uses iRacing for its realistic handling, would propably also prefer coke over water to satisfy his thirst. However the majority of people will take a can of water into the desert, but will opt for the coke to go with the pizza.
    Its all about making educated decisions
    Within the small bubble of sim racers, by 2017 we all know what iRacing is, what its good at, and where it lacks.

    Your next artice ought to be about how dangerous cigarettes are, and why you do not smoke anymore now, and how you will not go back to smoking.
    About time someone sheds light onto this dark mystery…

    Like

      1. because is harder to be good at iracing than being good in forza horizon. Besides, what competition is there in forza horizon? Maybe if you said forza motorsport.

        But the point is that I noticed iracers care for being hard not for being realistic.

        Like

    1. “iRacing has a shit tyre model, this was so 8 years ago, and it still holds true.”

      Many of iRacing-related articles do complain about the horrible tire model.

      Like

  11. Who the fuck is doing the physics in the tire model of a racing is fucking incompetent let me repeat that in a bed to get Google Voice to actually fucking type it out correctly I said whoever the fuck is doing the tire physics for a racing sucks not fucking a racing racing for fucksake

    Like

  12. It’s weird that you don’t show the same kind of autism you do towards the iracing tyre model when you talk about any other sim on here, or indeed arcade games.

    You always seem to completely gloss over anything iRacing does well, whilst simultaneously exaggerating the things they do badly every time you write an article about them. It makes it very hard to take anything you say seriously.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Because iceRacing claims to be this super-accurate simulator with cars that drive just like the real thing. And every single iRacing article, he already mentions how it has unparalleled online excellence. I suspect he wouldn’t need to write about the fantasy tire model if iRacing would stop making claims about its wonderful accuracy.

      This isn’t a *review* site, btw. It’s a blog. You seem to be implying that every single mention of a game has to include an exhaustive catalog of all its good and bad points.

      What he’s saying in this article is much more focused: The iRacing tire model is so bad that it renders the game useless for someone trying to use simulators as a driver training tool. Did you even read it?

      Like

    2. Because iRacing keeps marketing itself (and the fanboys regurgitate this over and over) as the most realistic racing simulator.. when it’s clearly not even in the top 5.. never has been. It was always a bit wonky.

      Truth usually comes out and it’s been slowly but surely dawning on people that unfortunately iRacing isn’t at all good when it comes to physics (especially the tire model.. but there are other oddities too).

      .. also, nobody is glossing over what iRacing does well. On the contrary. It is a very well established fact that iRacing has by far the best online system and that they completely innovated this space with iRating and Safety Rating. It’s also _the only_ reason to keep playing iRacing.

      Like

  13. Interesting article. I stopped playing iRacing both for being too expensive and for promoting unrealistic driving styles. Looking at telemetry of fastest and experienced Skip Barber iRacing drivers I always contemplated why they were coasting for such a long time. Yes that rendition of the car is very understeery, but they were coasting TOO MUCH, even in places that you would have wanted to carry much more speed, for just wanting to rotate the car. That tyre behaviour might explain it.

    Like

  14. Thankfully, a rival developer appreciated this kind of diligence rather than actively suppressed it, and as a result now I have a cool job and a race car sponsorship to boot.

    “The other developer” kinda did supressed it. Its amazing that you dont see this yourself.

    Like

  15. You think you know better than King Kaemmer, who has 25 years of experience working with complex tire models? Kaemmer has refined the physics model and honed it to perfection over the last decade.

    Like

    1. Is King Kaemmer the dude that claimed that in properly setup race cars the outside of the tire has the highest temperature because it touches the ground less?

      I don’t know where he spent his last 25 years but it wasn’t on earth.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Bwahahahahaha. King Kaemmer. Yes, the dude everybody wants to worship.. so that they can feel smart about themselves, only to disclose just how stupid they are.

      Congratulations! You’ve won the Lowest IQ of the month award!

      Like

  16. Great article, reminds me of this qualifying lap video, the guy is pushing his tires as hard as possible and over steering everywhere, sets the lap record!
    In iRacing he would be slow and spun in T2 without being able to recover it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hah! That’s how my driving looks like in pCars 2! It’s going to be epic! So many of you fools are going to be incredibly surprised.

      Like

  17. Sponsored by Ian Bell, BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAAHAHHAHAHAAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH
    Priceless

    Like

  18. The comments here have really taken a turn for the worse. Reminds me of some highly regulated GTplanet nonsense.

    where are the anal pro lapse and LFS dudes?

    Like

    1. >highly regulated
      The anal and LFS truther guys have been kicked out, and yet since James sold out the comments are getting worse and worse. Try harder.

      Like

  19. Front wheel drive cars don’t “fucking suck”. Maybe you just fucking suck at driving them.

    Like

                    1. RWD (or well setup AWD) are usually faster than FWD… At one point it’s physics, FWD tries to do too much on one end of the car and gets overloaded.

                      With that said, a well setup FWD is way harder to drive fast. It’s just that most people have terminally understeery cars, whilst an actually fast FWD will want to spin out all the time. Do need a locking diff however, open wont be able to pull the car good enough, so it will need to be more understeery.

                      But yeah, it’s just different. I prefer RWD but a well setup car is a well setup car. It’s just a bit more rare with other platforms.

                      Like

          1. That Nissan LMP1 you are talking about was supposed to be four-wheel drive hybrid. It became FWD because they could not figure out the hybrid problems in time.

            Like

  20. James Will market PC2 for month so his opinion is inapropriate till november last year with his new cool job with SMS. Next Reader submission : Why i choose not to follow PRC’s arguments anymore.

    Like

    1. His arguments weren’t to be followed even before the pcars2 sellout move. Anyone with some critical thinking would have observed that.

      Like

  21. King Kaemmer has come so close to perfection with iRacing’s latest tire model iteration, but Dave is a perfectionist, he is never entirely contented with the model and that’s why it will only get better and better.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. David Kaemmer has an undergrad math degree from Oberlin. I can’t find any info that would suggest he’s ever done any sort of competitive driving.

      This is the person you believe is highly qualified to tell us what a racing slick should feel like when driven near the limit of adhesion.

      That’s amusing.

      Like

  22. “Why I Chose Not to Return to iRacing”

    “Because I’m a huge homo who loves weiners.”

    There I made the article more concise for you.

    Like

  23. “Why I Chose Not to Return to iRacing”

    We don’t care and even less the people in iracing will care.
    This guy thinks simracing is about him and his shitty opinions.

    Inb4 you ask why we are here, some sort of bad entertainment. But damn these iracing articles are boring.

    Like

  24. Tire model still needs work, this is no secret, but your very shortsighted for using it as your reason for not returning.

    Don’t you think the advantage of skills and reactions gained of actually racing head to head against some really great late model drivers in the sim (majeski) would far outweigh the minor negatives of only being able to do fast laps with cold tires?

    Last I heard your going to be in a racing series, not a hot lap competition.

    Good luck keeping yourself racing form sharp.

    The reality is that you didn’t return because you needed to save face. You want to come back, that’s pretty obvious. No one would write as much as you do about iracing if they didn’t give two hoots about the sim. You’ve backed yourself into a corner with all the shit slinging. You can’t come back because you would look even more hypocritical than you already do with the whole SMS deal.

    Don’t shit where you eat, ya know

    Like

      1. I meant in Late Model Racing Specifically. Dont have that in many, if any other sims.

        But im glad you shared all your meaningless GT/DTM virtual race wins with me, im sure those have all the relevancy in the world to running circles in a late model.

        Like

          1. ignore the friggin tires, running races against other humans is far more relevant to you than the fact that the speed is a little wonky with tire temps. That doesnt change the skills you gain from racing other people.

            Like

            1. I think you’d have a pretty valid point if I was stepping into a late model at 34 years old and hadn’t done any kind of competitive online sim racing since I was 17, but I’ve spent the past seven years racing in online leagues across a variety of simulators – and I’ve always placed well. In fact, I can’t even say I’ve had some sort of online career slump due to previous inactivity.

              It’s certainly not something you forget overnight and need to constantly be practicing on a simulator to retain. Driving in a pack isn’t the same as playing guitar where if you don’t play for three days, you’re horribly rusty.

              This year I used 4Chan’s GT3 series (which is fairly lax on contact rules) and HSO’s Cart 88 league to stay sharp. Last year it was the Brazil touring car series at Realish Racing & a whole bunch of Race2Play stuff. Those leagues only lasted a couple months out of the year, with off-weeks in between rounds, and it was more than enough to keep in shape.

              There’s also a karting facility here in Edmonton that offers enormous discounts past 10pm on weeknights (stupidly cheap for a lot of racing), so I’m out karting twice a week.

              Then there’s testing pCars 2, which is practice in itself.

              Though if tires physics and realistic vehicle dynamics take a backseat to human competition, I guess I could just throw down with an equally competent buddy of mine in DiRT 3 rallycross.

              Like

    1. Here I’ll actually list off my league championships or miscellaneous special events for you because I’m bored:

      2012 iRacing K&N Series Season 3 Overall Champion
      2012 iRacing Indycar Mid-Ohio 100 Winner
      2013 iRacing K&N Series Season 1 Overall Champion
      *2013 iRacing 2.4 Hours of Daytona Winner (lower split, disregard if you want)
      2013 iRacing Coca-Cola 600 Winner (it was called the Nordgar 600 if you want to get technical)
      2014 4Chan rFactor GT3 Series Season 1 Winner
      2015 4Chan rFactor GT2/P2 Series GT2 Champion
      2016 rFactor 2 FKR Porsche Cup Series Champion
      2016 R3E WALTHAM DTM Series Champion
      2016 rFactor 2 Moonshine GT Sprint Series Champion
      2016 Race2Play BAJA 500 Overall Champion

      And then the stuff I lost:

      2015 Racedepartment V8SCC Season 3: 4th place (of ~45 entrants)
      2016 Realish Racing HBTM Series: 4th place (of ~30 entrants)

      I mean if I had dementia or was struck by lightning and lost all of my skills then yeah it would be worth coming back, but pack dynamics aren’t something you just *forget* overnight.

      Like

    2. David Kaemmer has a math degree that would qualify him to teach a high school math class. Has he ever done a single lap in a proper race car?

      If his tire model felt ridiculous, how would he even know?

      Like

  25. By the way, in regards to this entry. It would merit a deeper investigation and examples of situations where banned users could (and should) pursue a refund and know what argument they can use. If iRacing doesn’t comply, they can try pursuing legal avenues on small claims courts and possibly seek for iRacing (if deemed guilty) to pay legal expenses.

    Like

  26. Austin is right: Using iRacing as some sort of training tool would give you a bunch of really bad habits on a real track. Their tire model feels and acts nothing like anything I’ve ever driven IRL.

    Also: Good to see R3E get some credit here. With over 30 years of track experience in a variety of cars, it’s the only sim whose tires feel right to me (even if you can’t adjust the pressures – maybe to prevent exploits?).

    Like

    1. Admittedly I havent tried every cars on R3E, but to me it just seemed overall FAR too permissive. The shit I could get away with was quite hilarious. But in a different way than AC.

      iR is probably a bit weird over the edge sometimes, but interestingly enough they went too far, at least for the GT3 cars, around the Sebring 12H update. Found I could overdrive far too much without really trying. An in-between would seem better. But for sure the heating properties are still fucked, as well as cambers.

      Even so, iR still gives me the best feedback out of all of them. It just feels better and more alive. Although far from perfect obviously. But so are every other sims. No one got it right yet, and more ways than not.

      Like

      1. See the video posted above (“Doerr Motorsport 12C GT3 sets lap record at the Nurburgring 24 Hours”) and tell me if that bears any resemblance at all to what you can do in iceRacing.

        His corner entry looks very similar to how it works in R3E. And Yes – you can get away with sliding a bit. IRL it doesn’t cook the tires in the way that iRacing depicts.

        If you drove a real GT3 car the way iRacing trains you, you’d be several seconds per lap off the slowest runner.

        Like

    2. Maybe in certain cars where there is extensive downforce, it can be overlooked. After all, Max Verstappen uses/used iRacing more than any other game. I’m still not supporting them either way after F1rst and the price hike + poor Thanksgiving discounts.

      Like

      1. That’s complete bullshit. He plays a variety of simulators. Also notable is how often Felippe Massa plays Game Stock Car (or Automobilista now) and how critical he has been of iRacing when asked.

        Like

  27. ‘Why I chose not to return to iRacing’

    How about that you have a major sponsorship deal with a major competitor of iRacing, and frankly it wouldn’t look good, and would most likely rile Mr Bell.

    It’s like Lewis Hamilton wearing a swatch, when he’s sponsored by Tag Heure

    Like

  28. Quote “An active racer in the real world, Kaemmer won 19 races in the Skip Barber Racing Championship and held the series’ lap record at Lime Rock Park.”

    Like

    1. Which is why the skip barber was pretty damn good on the OTM.. most other cars sucked balls though. And then the NTM destroyed everything, even the Skippy.

      Liked by 1 person

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